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A Twitter user kicked a hornet's nest with a question that keyed on the site where some of modern life's most biting, passive aggressive behavior goes down:

THE WORK EMAIL.

But unlike a swarm of poisonous insects, this "hornet's nest" is downright hilarious and wildly relatable to so many people.


Twitter user delia paunescu (@deliap) is the hero of the day. She's clearly been working with plenty of office life's most wishy-washy divas lately.

Apparently plenty of other people have at least noticed the very unique vernacular of corporate life, as just over 21,000 replies proves.

Or perhaps "noticed" doesn't quite get at the heart of these repliers' emotions. Perhaps "seethed" is better.

Or maybe "interpreted with horror" is more accurate.

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After all, this passive aggression isn't about dishes in the apartment. Healthcare benefits, Paid Family Leave and Casual Friday's are on the line here, people.

This one—the fake apology with a left hook—is a classic.


How does one gently remind a superior that they do, in fact, exist?




Never good when your boss begins an email with a sentence containing no verbs.

And, for some gentle office drama resolution...


@baddestmamajama/Twitter


Well this one is just plain aggressive.



This one here provides some passive aggression in real time.


Quite sure the dynamics of email introductions will elude everyone forever...


High marks to this one for using the word "minions."


The long con...

It feels relevant to close with this scene from the 2007 film Charlie Wilson's War.

Besides the insane hair and glasses, note how Philip Seymour Hoffman's character has zero interest whatsoever in email niceties.

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Direct confrontation is important for reducing office conflict. But no one is recommending you throw a chair through a glass window.

Maybe a phone call or a face to face would do the job?

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


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