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Wednesday, researchers with The Event Horizon Telescope project released the first-ever photograph of a black hole, more than a century after Albert Einstein theorized their existence.

The photograph is a huge step forward, marking the culmination of a century's work of scientific theory.

So naturally, people had lots of questions once the news began to trend online.


Meet Leah Crane.

She's a space and physics reporter with New Scientist who decided to answer questions in conjunction with the photograph's release.

It all started when the New Scientist Twitter account offered to answer as many questions as possible once the results of the research team's findings were published.

The questions came in rather speedily.


In case you've ever wondered about getting sucked into a black hole...


In case you're wondering what dying by black hole would be like...


Soon the now famous photograph made its debut...

...and with it came even more questions, like:

"How did we even manage this?"


In case you're wondering about that brightness...


Oh, and about that rotation...


Where IS that event horizon we keep hearing about?


In case you're wondering about this discovery's scientific impact...


And what about the singularity?


On the subject of energy...


And what about Hawking radiation?


And what about spiral galaxies?


What came first?


Where does all this stuff actually go?


And do black holes actually grow?


How hot is this thing?


But what about Sagittarius A*?


We'd love to know the difference.


Crane eventually had to stop answering questions—she, like most of us, had to get back to work—but we greatly appreciate the time she spent demystifying one of science's most fascinating achievements.

Christmas is upon us. It's time to get those Christmas present lists together.

So... who has been naughty and who has been nice?

Who is getting diamonds and who is getting coal? Yuck, coal. Is that even a thing anymore? Who even started that idea?

There has to be some funnier or more "for the times" type of "you've been naughty" stocking stuffer.

I feel like the statement coal used to make is kind of last century at this point.

Apparently I'm not alone in this thinking.

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What is it about them that stirs up these feelings?

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They say your 30's hits different, like one day you're young a hopeful and the next day you're just WAY too old for this.

What is the "this" you're suddenly too old for?

No idea. It's different for everyone, but make no mistake, it'll happen to you too.

Maybe it already has?

Giphy

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Do all mothers go to the say mom school or something? Because they seem to share the same advice or go on the same platitudes, don't they?

Here's an idea.

Maybe they're just older, have more experience, and are trying to keep us from being dumbasses in public. At least, that's what I think.

I'm definitely grateful for my mother's advice—it's saved me more than once—and it seems many out there are too. And they all seem to have heard the same things from their mothers, too.

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