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Wednesday, researchers with The Event Horizon Telescope project released the first-ever photograph of a black hole, more than a century after Albert Einstein theorized their existence.

The photograph is a huge step forward, marking the culmination of a century's work of scientific theory.

So naturally, people had lots of questions once the news began to trend online.


Meet Leah Crane.

She's a space and physics reporter with New Scientist who decided to answer questions in conjunction with the photograph's release.

It all started when the New Scientist Twitter account offered to answer as many questions as possible once the results of the research team's findings were published.

The questions came in rather speedily.


In case you've ever wondered about getting sucked into a black hole...


In case you're wondering what dying by black hole would be like...


Soon the now famous photograph made its debut...

...and with it came even more questions, like:

"How did we even manage this?"


In case you're wondering about that brightness...


Oh, and about that rotation...


Where IS that event horizon we keep hearing about?


In case you're wondering about this discovery's scientific impact...


And what about the singularity?


On the subject of energy...


And what about Hawking radiation?


And what about spiral galaxies?


What came first?


Where does all this stuff actually go?


And do black holes actually grow?


How hot is this thing?


But what about Sagittarius A*?


We'd love to know the difference.


Crane eventually had to stop answering questions—she, like most of us, had to get back to work—but we greatly appreciate the time she spent demystifying one of science's most fascinating achievements.

Manipulation is designed to be stealthy. We hardly recognize it when it's happening to us because our abuser has forced it to appear under wraps.

But when we recognize it for what it really is, we really feel like we've been smacked across the face. There is no other descriptor for it. Usually we've trusted and loved those that manipulated us.

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Image by Anita S. from Pixabay

Just as new mothers encounter the sudden, influential developments of powerful hormone changes, protective instincts, and milk production, so new fathers undergo some key changes of their own.

Their socks become exclusively white, climbing higher up the calf than ever before. All their shorts sprout cargo pockets and clunky belt loop cell phone holders. They start to really lean in to their old records.

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Image by Patricia Srigley from Pixabay

Cleaning up is hard enough when it's just clearing a month of dust bunnies. Can you imagine cleaning the debris left by murder, suicide and violence? I have a really great friend who used to do crime scene clean-up for a living. The pay is incredible; it starts at $55 an hour. But there is a much higher cost in mental well being. Death affects you in ways you don't always feel immediately. My friend has stories of nightmares, depression and pain after leaving scenes of horror. Why make all that money just to spend it on therapy? It takes a certain type of person.

***TRIGGER WARNING. CONTENTS ARE SENSITIVE ***

Redditor u/MemegodDave wanted to hear from the people who have the stomach to come in after crime and tragedy

to try to bring back some form of normalcy to the location by asking... People who make their living out of cleaning murder scenes, accidents and the like, what is the worst thing you have experienced in your career?

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We all know the telltale signs that something is making us uncomfortable. Suddenly, we begin shaking, either in our hands or knees or toes. Then, usually, sweat starts pouring out of every part of our body, making it look like we just ran through a rainstorm underneath a waterfall. Finally, we lose our regular speech functions. Everything goes out of sync and our words don't match up to what's in our minds.

What's interesting is that what usually brings about these fits of uncomfortableness differs from person to person, as evidenced by the stories below.

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