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The world is vast, as is history, science; there is so much information to be had.

Not all of that information is pleasant. Sometimes you come across something you wish you'd never known. And to cap it all off, there's nothing to be done or that should be done with this information. You're just doomed to know it.


u/Black_zetsu_yt asked:

What are some useless scary facts?

Here were some of those answers.


Blub Blub

Lake Superior has dead bodies from the 1920s.

With freezing temperatures and a lack of oxygen, bodies don't decompose at the rate they would under normal conditions. Sure, they don't look as "fresh" as the day they died (in fact they're covered in bodily fat from saponification), but they can be recognized as human remains.

In fact, there's been this ongoing debate because of the ship SS Edmund Fitzgerald that sank in the 70s, because scuba divers wanted to explore it but the families of the deceased were upset because this is basically a mass grave.

There's a YouTube channel called Ask a Mortician that just did an episode on this, and I really recommend it. She goes a lot more in-depth about the facts, and even went out there to talk with a surviving Fitzgerald relative.

HumanityIsACesspool

So....Don't Do Dat

Not exactly useless, but there have been quite a few men who have died at the Grand Canyon because they thought it would be cool to take piss over a ledge, only to lose their balance.

nakedonmygoat

Arrhythmia

You can have a heart attack and die at any second because of a heart problem you never knew about. There's one called Brugada syndrome which has no physical evidence and most people aren't diagnosed with it until they drop down dead and testing is done on immediate family members (it's genetic) and one of THEM is diagnosed with it. Happened to my father. We found out because I'm the one tested who has it, my uncle and brother got the all clear, chances are my grandad has it too (4 heart attacks since he was in his mid 40s)

SwordTaster

One Of The Worst Ways To Die

When people are crucified, they rarely die from bleeding out; instead, they die from asphyxiation, or suffocation. The way their bodies are hung makes it almost impossible to breathe unless they physically hold themselves up instead of just hanging there, and after some many hours it gets to be to much, resulting in oxygen deprivation, unconsciousness, and death.

existential-misery

So Go To The Doctor Then!

Your body produces a cancerous cell about once every thirty minutes.

Your immune system is usually very, very efficient at finding and immediately neutralizing them.

But it's very possible that thirty minutes from now will be the time your immune system slips up and allows it to reproduce.

GeraltofOuterHeavia

Listen Up, City Slickers

Bed bugs can survive for up to a year without feeding under the correct temperatures. As adults the females can lay 300 eggs in their lifetimes. You could be spending thousands of dollars and eventually just get infested again. And bed bugs are making a comeback after almost being eradicated.

fudgechilli

A Delicate Balance

That one day the planet Mercury will get eaten by the sun. But in the 1% chance it actually flings out of orbit, (it's useless to us because we won't be around), it could potentially (mind you it's a low chance for this to happen) hit Venus or maybe even Earth and send flying particles all over the system. The reason why it would get thrown out is because Jupiter is actually tugging on it and making its orbit more elliptical and may eventually get thrown out entirely.

Galaxy_214

Nothing Can Stop Those Ears

According to some research a human head may remain conscious for up to 30 seconds after decapitation. Most notably, a man named Dr. Beaurieux did a series of experiments in the early 1900's where he yelled at recently decapitated criminal's heads and saw a response.

gothic-interior

We Just Gotta Live Like We're Dyin'

There is a theory in quantum cosmology. It is the hypothesis that our universe is actually a 'false vacuum', meaning that it isn't in its most stable possible configuration. Think of a ball rolling on a surface having several local minima (dents in the surface) but there is only one global minima (the dent which is the deepest). The ball may be in one of the dents which is not the deepest one. So, it is stable for now, but, given the chance it will slide to the deepest dent, which is the lowest energy configuration possible, the so-called 'true vacuum'.

Now the interesting part. If our universe is, indeed, in a false vacuum, due to something called 'quantum tunneling', it may 'tunnel' into the true vacuum, creating a bubble of lower energy. Once this lower energy bubble is formed, it expands, engulfing the entire universe, destroying everything we know as is, and creating new laws of physics. The speed of expanding is the speed of light, so we would have no information whatsoever about it before it hits us. We will literally never see it coming.

The really scary and really useless part? There is absolutely nothing we can do about it.

loopystring

Passing Strange

Scientists don't know what matter is like inside neutron stars, but some theorize it's a kind of "strange matter" that, if it exists, may turn everything it touches into strange matter. If two neutron stars collide (which does happen) microscopic strange matter particles could fly through space until they eventually reach Earth, at which point the planet and everything on it would turn into strange matter and be destroyed.

WreckNRepeat

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

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