KMazur
/ Contributor via Getty Images

You know what's annoying? When people use the term "literally", well, not literally. It kind of defeats the entire purpose of the word! I'm not the only person frustrated- this batch of Redditors also have a thing or two to say about misusing words.

u/JohnO500 asked: What words are misused the most and how?


Annoyances of having a pet snake.

"Is that snake poisonous?"

"Nope, sure is venomous though."

Drowsiest_Approval

Explanation:

If you bite it and you die, it's poisonous.

If it bites you and you die, it's venomous.

SolDarkHunter

Effect = noun.

Giphy

Affect vs. Effect, a classic one! A lot of people still tend to confuse the two.

Affect is a verb ("He affected me badly"), while effect is a noun ("He had a bad effect on me")

WhiteFlatBlonde

Breathetaking.

Lots of people get the words Loose and Lose mixed up.

Dooty_Shirker

Breath and breathe, too.

maximumovarize

Your breathetaking.

JoyFerret

10pm specific time.

Can you be more pacific?

peaches13185

"Specific time? Do you mean 10:00 Pacific time?"

"No, I think they mean it comes on specifically at 10."

-- A Family Guy bit I still remember

scottevil110

Kind've?

Giphy

Of. It's would've, that comes from would HAVE, not would of.

theofiel

I saw a Youtube comment that said, ''it's kind've strange that...'' last week.

balticromancemyass

The opposite of what you think it means.

Pseudo. It means false/fake, but people often use it to mean "sort of." The word they're looking for is "quasi."

snickherdoodle

Or how about "factoid". All too commonly confused for a literal fact, which it is literally not.

kthxtyler

The more you know.

Literally has come to mean "figuratively".

brock_lee

While that's certainly annoying, it isn't as bad as it seems on the surface. The reason why people use "literally" to mean "figuratively, but stronger" is because the original meaning has been preserved. Without that base, the abuse wouldn't happen... which means that the abuse itself is still governed by the real definition.

RamsesThePigeon

A real pet peeve.

Giphy

My biggest pet peeve is the phrase "I could care less". THAT LITERALLY MEANS THE COMPLETE OPPOSITE OF WHAT YOU WANT TO SAY.

JarahCarnes

Yes!!

Saying I could care less means you care enough to be able to actually care even less than you do now.

I couldn't care less means you're at the bottom of that barrel and it can't sink lower.

cheapbitoffluff

THIS.

"Depression" "OCD"

Like my Psychology professor said the more you misused this word, the more it loses it's power as a symptom.

JDegamo

Yeah, and Bipolar is a serious mental illness, not just being indecisive/moody.

bigfootsbro

I'm wary of people who do this.

I see weary and wary misused on Reddit all the time, and less often I hear them being misused irl. They all sound similar, so I can see where the confusion comes from, but...

Weary is tired- you are weary from a long journey.

Wary is suspicious and cautious in regards to something- you should be wary of strangers with gifts.

technicolored_dreams

People do that???

Giphy

I hate it when people confuse the words fun and funny. It isn't even that hard but I always see stuff like "This amusement park was so funny!" and it is one of my pet peeves honestly.

PiRSquared2

An important distinction.

Empathy. People often mean they are sympathetic, and do not truly feel actual empathy.

Sympathy is to feel for someone.

Empathy is to put yourself in their shoes and truly understand.

my_hat_is_fat

It's called the UK.

England, people use 'England' to describe the UK, like Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are part of England.

Class_444_SWR

Not awkward.

Giphy

My psychology teacher told us that anti-social is not the same as socially awkward. Anti-social is more like people that have absolutely no empathy for others. Like the school shooter type.

saltyasss

Not a word.

Anyways.

It is not a godd*mn word and I pulls me out of any conversation, movie, TV show, book, etc whenever I run across it. Anyway I try, I just can't get over it.

Nnnkingston

Harry Cunningham/Unsplash

You may have heard of the phrase "retail therapy" before, which is the act of buying things for personal enjoyment.

Well, there's some truth to that.

The University of Michigan actually studied the affects of shopping on our sadness levels. Purchasing something you enjoy can actually decrease sadness 40 times better than not purchasing something.

There are tons of other benefits like dopamine increases, anxiety reduction and improved mood. We wanted to know what people are buying to give them that rush of happy hormones and increase their joy.

Keep reading... Show less
Jessica Podraza/Unsplash

When we think of a "hero" we might think of someone in a cape who's saving civilians from terror. Or maybe we think of the essential workers we've called heroes throughout the pandemic.

Heroism is simply defined as "great bravery," according to Oxford Languages.

If being a hero is about showing courage, bravery and strength, heroic feats happen all around us every day with ordinary people.

Keep reading... Show less
Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

They say good things come in small packages—as a lifelong member of the "Never hit 5 feet tall" club it's a phrase I've had thrown at me often.

It's right up there with "small but mighty" and "people mcnugget."

It's popular because there's a fair bit of truth to it, though.

When it comes to some things, smaller is just flat out better.

Keep reading... Show less
OSPAN ALI on Unsplash

Everyone has their "type" when it comes to sexual attraction.

It could be a woman's scent, a man's fashion sense, or a confident attitude that really gets a heart fluttering at 100 m.p.h.
However, what someone thinks is "hot" or "sexy" may be a total turn-off for others.
Keep reading... Show less