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Representative Richard Creagan of Hawaii has proposed new state legislation that will make the state's smoking laws stricter than they already are.


On December 29, 2015, Governor David Y. Ige announced that Hawaii would be the first-ever state to change the minimum tobacco-buying age.

Beginning January 1, 2016, the lowest legal tobacco purchasing age became 21 years of age.

At the time, Hawaii's Director of Health Virginia Pressler stated:

"We are proud to once again be at the forefront of the nation in tobacco prevention and control."

Recently, Hawaii representative Richard Creagan wants to, again, be at the "forefront" of "tobacco prevention and control."

Creagan proposed that his state increase the minimum age to buy tobacco to a shocking 100 years old.

His proposal does not include the sales of e-cigarettes, cigars or chewing tobacco.

Creagan spoke about his seemingly dramatic proposal.

"Basically, we essentially have a group who are heavily addicted - in my view enslaved by a ridiculously bad industry, which has enslaved them by designing a cigarette that is highly addictive, knowing that it highly lethal. And, it is."

He continued.

"This is more lethal, more dangerous than any prescription drug, and it is more addicting. In my view, you are taking people who are enslaved from a horrific addiction, and freeing people from horrific enslavement."

Creagan concluded by explaining why it was his job as an official to make such drastic changes.

"We, as legislators, have a duty to do things to save people's lives. If we don't ban cigarettes, we are killing people."

According to Fox 5 DC, the bill would annually increase the minimum age in increments of approximately 10 years until jumping up to 100 years of age in 2024.

People are loving the creative way of indirectly stopping people from smoking.





Others wonder what sorts of repercussions the law might have.




Personally, I'm all about lowering the negative impact humans have on our planet in any way we can.

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