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Ellen Page Gives A Powerful Reminder That LGBTQ Rights Are 'Not A Debate'

LGBT+

Ellen Page is taking a stand.

The actress, who made her name in critically acclaimed films like Hard Candy, Juno and Inception, said in an interview with BBC Radio 5 that LGBTQ rights are "not a debate."


Page came out during a speech at the Human Rights Campaign's "Time to Thrive" conference in Las Vegas in 2014. Since then she established herself as a fierce advocate for the community since.

"Of course, there's been so much progress that we've seen, wonderful progress. But a lot of the most marginalized people in the community get left behind," Page said, noting that "transphobic violence" has claimed the lives of many trans women of color, whom research shows have a life expectancy of 35 years.

Page also addressed President Donald Trump's administration's decision to roll back transgender rights, including the Supreme Court ruling banning transgender individuals from serving in the military in any capacity.

"It needs to go so much further, particularly in media who are pretending that it's a debate whether or not trans people should have rights," she said.

"It's a debate whether it's OK to have a religious liberty law that would give you the right to deny an LGBTQ person service."

She added:

"That's not a debate. That's an excuse that has been used countless times, whether it was during segregation, interracial marriage, what have you."

Many have praised Page for her continued advocacy on behalf of the LGBTQ community and other marginalized groups.



The Daily Beast also published an op-ed thanking Page for her "queer rage":

"Page gave voice to the queer pain that often gets drowned out by so much other noise: LGBT youth—especially transgender youth—are indeed far more likely to attempt suicide than their peers."
"Hate crimes are on the rise. Transgender people are being gunned down, stabbed, and beaten."
"These are not isolated phenomena occurring separate and apart from the White House's long list of anti-LGBT actions; rather, as Page pointed out, they are fueled by a federal government that not only fails to protect LGBT people, but actively attacks us."

Page made headlines in the last week after she criticized Jurassic World and Parks and Recreation actor Chris Pratt for attending the Zoe Church in Los Angeles. The church stance on LGBTQ people has come under scrutiny.

Page raised the question when she retweeted a message from The Hollywood Reporter about Pratt's recent interview with Stephen Colbert during which he discussed his evangelical faith.

Page suggested that Colbert should have asked Pratt about his church being "infamously anti LGBTQ."


In a follow-up message, she said:

"If you are a famous actor and you belong to an organization that hates a certain group of people, don't be surprised if someone simply wonders why it's not addressed. Being anti LGBTQ is wrong, there aren't two sides. The damage it causes is severe."

Pratt later took to social media himself to defend his church.

"Nothing could be further from the truth," he wrote. "I go to a church that opens their doors to absolutely everyone."

He continued by comparing a choice to end a marriage with people's sexuality and gender identity:

"Despite what the Bible says about divorce my church community was there for me every step of the way, never judging, just gracefully accompanying me on my walk."
"They helped me tremendously offering love and support. It is what I have seen them do for others on countless occasions regardless of sexual orientation, race or gender..."
"Jesus said, 'I give you a new command, love one another.' This is what guides me in my life. He is a God of Love, Acceptance and Forgiveness. Hate has no place in my or this world."


Zoe Church's pastor Chad Veach said in an interview with The New York Times that he modeled his church on the evangelical Hillsong Church, whose pastor, Bryan Houston, has said "is not a church that affirms a gay lifestyle."

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