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LGBT people have made significant strides in recent decades.

Much of the community is lucky enough to be themselves openly, with few people mistakenly regarding them as abnormal in most of the western world.

So why do so many feel the need to shield children from their existence?


This question arose after the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)'s political debate program Question Time posed a question of its own on Twitter.

The question hinges on the presumption that LGBT people are abnormal, since no one questions whether or not it's "morally right" for young children to be fed fairy tales with heterosexuals in love or jokingly asked by adults if they have a boyfriend or girlfriend.

No one pontificates on whether or not straight couples on billboards and magazines should be shielded from young eyes.

This is likely because heterosexual relationships are seen to have more facets than sex. LGBT relationships—and people—aren't always granted this presumption of nuance.

As many pointed out, LGBT people exist and their existence alone isn't inappropriate for children.



Children are perfectly capable of understanding that two people of the same sex can love each other and have a perfectly healthy relationship.








Turns out, the question sounds bonkers when 'LGBT' is replaced with 'heterosexual.'


Soon, people were asking Question Time some questions of their own.






Do better, BBC.

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