JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
@jhardesty's/Instagram

They say if you love what you do you'll never work a day in your life.

For one UPS driver with a passion and a camera the saying seems to be true.


When New Orleans UPS driver Jason (Jay) Hardesty was reassigned a new neighborhood he noticed many of the dogs along his delivery route were rather friendly. So Jay began taking selfies with them and showing off the pics on Instagram.

His heartwarming hobby has turned into a viral hit. People are falling in love with the charming series.

Now every Friday Jay posts a new selfie with one of the friendly pups he encounters along his route under the hashtag #PupsofJay.










In an interview with INSIDER Jay talked about how the series came to be.

"My old route that I was on, the dogs in that area weren't really too friendly. They would always want to be guard dogs, or aggressive dogs because it was more of a family area."
"But when they moved me to a certain part of town which has not as many families, the dogs are a lot nicer."
"I realized they would let you pick them up and pet them,."
"So I guess maybe a few years ago I started throwing up a dog on it every week. Just a cute pup."







Once a local secret, Jay's account skyrocketed to national attention after one of his two-legged customers, New York Times best selling author Jami Attenberg, decided to tell others about the priceless selfies.


Over night Jay went from 2000 followers to more than 40,000 and now his adorable series of selfies are spreading joy well beyond New Orleans.






Jay, who also enjoys taking photos of the vibrantly colored homes around NOLA, told INSIDER that despite meeting many more friendly pooches during the week, he limits himself to just one post, usually on Friday's to end the work week on a high note.

"I don't want my account to be known as a dog account, but I'll still find a cute dog and post it that week."

For more of Jay's precious pups you can find him on Instagram @jhardesty.

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

Keep reading... Show less