This article is based on a status posted to Zanub Rizvi's Facebook page. If you're interested in reading more, check out the link at the bottom of the article.



Source

Share this amazing story by clicking below!

Jose Antonio Gallego Vazquez /Unsplash

There are few things in the world as surreal or unsettling as the sudden realization that you need to get away, and you need to get away now.

That building dread, rush of fear, and jolt adrenaline is one of those things you see in movies, or you hear talked about in self-defense classes, but there's nothing like experiencing it yourself.

Keep reading... Show less

I never got on a rollercoaster until my mid-20s.

This fact shocked people when I was growing up and they wondered if I was a scaredy-cat or something (a feeling that would have been perfectly valid, by the way, though it did not necessarily apply to me).

Truth be told, I don't think I was ever really all that interested. I just figured that once it happened, it would happen, and that would be that.

It did happen, of course. And it was fun! I did it a few more times a few years later while on another trip.

But I'm not the only one to have avoided or otherwise delayed certain experiences that others have assumed are commonplace.

People shared their stories after Redditor brokerdowndryer asked the online community,

"What is something common that has never happened to you?"
Keep reading... Show less
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

Some years ago, I had to advise a college friend to stop chasing the girl he was interested in at the time. She'd already turned him down. Explicitly. At least two or three times.

He wouldn't take no for an answer and didn't see anything wrong with his behavior.

Perhaps he'd seen too many movies where the guy eventually breaks through the girl's defenses and essentially coerces her into going out with him?

Keep reading... Show less
Caleb Woods/Unsplash

Parents make mistakes. We want to believe that parents are doing there very best to raise their kids, but sometimes they do more harm than good.

Research into childhood trauma didn't actually begin until the 1970s, so we don't have as much knowledge about our mental health as adults as we might like.

However, a study that followed 1,420 from 1992 to 2015 found conclusive results about childhood trauma:

"'It is a myth to believe that childhood trauma is a rare experience that only affects few,' the researchers say."
"Rather, their population sample suggests, 'it is a normative experience—it affects the majority of children at some point.'"
"A surprising 60 percent of those in the study were exposed to at least one trauma by age 16. Over 30 percent were exposed to multiple traumatic events."

Not all of the things our parents do that were not so helpful technically classify as trauma, but it definitely has an effect on us as we get older.

Keep reading... Show less