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The Nightmare Before Christmas is celebrating its 25th anniversary as the best and perhaps only Halloween/Christmas movie of all time.


To commemorate the anniversary, director Henry Selick sat down to talk to The Hollywood Reporter and dish on one particular joke he still regrets cutting from the film. Selick tells THR:

"There's a shot — and I really regret replacing it — at the very end of the film when Jack comes back and then Sandy Claws flies overhead and there's snow and Christmas comes to Halloween Town. We show a lot of Halloween Towners enjoying winter sports and snow and you see the vampires playing hockey and they hit the puck right at the camera — and originally it was Tim Burton's head. and it was really funny but Denise Di Novi or one of the Hollywood producers told me, 'I don't think Tim's going to like that.' And I feel so stupid for not just asking him. But that's one of the shots that we reshot and we put in a pumpkin instead. I don't know if that shot still exists, but I'd love to replace the one in there and I'm sure Tim would love it."

Come on, think. Where could that missing head be?


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Even without the missing joke, fans are celebrating the anniversary.


Dogs are getting in on the celebration.

Folks are sharing bits of trivia.

Now this debate could go on a while.





Ultimately it had to come down to Jack or Sally.


Of course, a flying Tim Burton head may have beat them all, but we'll never know.

H/T: Gizmodo, Comicbook

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