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The Yeti, or Abominable Snowman, is a mythical ape-like creature said to inhabit the Himalayan mountains.

Yeti "sightings" make the news from time to time, and the latest one has been met with the expected skepticism.


Mountaineers from the Indian Army (ADG PI) spotted 32-inch footprints near the Makalu Base Camp in Nepal that they claimed came from the Yeti.

ADG PI says the footprints were discovered and photographed on April 9.

The Yeti is the folkloric cousin to Bigfoot (or Sasquatch) and there has been no conclusive evidence that such creatures actually exist.

In fact, scholars like Daniel Taylor, who has been recognized for his work on the subject of theoretical social change and who wrote 2017's Yeti: The Ecology of a Mystery, say that the most likely culprits are a mother bear and her cub:

"In every case you will find that all yeti footprints were made by the Himalayan black bear, Ursus thibetanus."

He also explained how a bear would be able to make footprints that large, noting that mother bears produce overprints, which happen when her front foot goes down and the back foot goes down on the same spot.

The length of the footprint can be explained by the baby cub that "hops behind the mother." That, and snow melting along the edges of the print create the effect we see.

ADG PI has been ridiculed since it shared the tweet to its official social media account, with at least one person urging the agency to delete the tweet altogether to save India from "international embarrassment"...

...at least one person bringing in a healthy dose of skepticism...

...and others just in this game for laughs.




The Nepalese government has been a good sport about the whole Yeti thing, issuing hunting licenses in the 1960s to those who wanted to have a shot at capturing the legendary beast.

Genetic research published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B in 2017 found that nine bone, tooth, skin, hair and fecal samples attributed to the Yeti came from Asian black bears, Himalayan brown bears or Tibetan brown bears, with one sample even coming from a dog.

Manipulation is designed to be stealthy. We hardly recognize it when it's happening to us because our abuser has forced it to appear under wraps.

But when we recognize it for what it really is, we really feel like we've been smacked across the face. There is no other descriptor for it. Usually we've trusted and loved those that manipulated us.

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Image by Anita S. from Pixabay

Just as new mothers encounter the sudden, influential developments of powerful hormone changes, protective instincts, and milk production, so new fathers undergo some key changes of their own.

Their socks become exclusively white, climbing higher up the calf than ever before. All their shorts sprout cargo pockets and clunky belt loop cell phone holders. They start to really lean in to their old records.

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Image by Patricia Srigley from Pixabay

Cleaning up is hard enough when it's just clearing a month of dust bunnies. Can you imagine cleaning the debris left by murder, suicide and violence? I have a really great friend who used to do crime scene clean-up for a living. The pay is incredible; it starts at $55 an hour. But there is a much higher cost in mental well being. Death affects you in ways you don't always feel immediately. My friend has stories of nightmares, depression and pain after leaving scenes of horror. Why make all that money just to spend it on therapy? It takes a certain type of person.

***TRIGGER WARNING. CONTENTS ARE SENSITIVE ***

Redditor u/MemegodDave wanted to hear from the people who have the stomach to come in after crime and tragedy

to try to bring back some form of normalcy to the location by asking... People who make their living out of cleaning murder scenes, accidents and the like, what is the worst thing you have experienced in your career?

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We all know the telltale signs that something is making us uncomfortable. Suddenly, we begin shaking, either in our hands or knees or toes. Then, usually, sweat starts pouring out of every part of our body, making it look like we just ran through a rainstorm underneath a waterfall. Finally, we lose our regular speech functions. Everything goes out of sync and our words don't match up to what's in our minds.

What's interesting is that what usually brings about these fits of uncomfortableness differs from person to person, as evidenced by the stories below.

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