Getty Images // @raptorsworld/Twitter




The Yeti, or Abominable Snowman, is a mythical ape-like creature said to inhabit the Himalayan mountains.

Yeti "sightings" make the news from time to time, and the latest one has been met with the expected skepticism.


Mountaineers from the Indian Army (ADG PI) spotted 32-inch footprints near the Makalu Base Camp in Nepal that they claimed came from the Yeti.

ADG PI says the footprints were discovered and photographed on April 9.

The Yeti is the folkloric cousin to Bigfoot (or Sasquatch) and there has been no conclusive evidence that such creatures actually exist.

In fact, scholars like Daniel Taylor, who has been recognized for his work on the subject of theoretical social change and who wrote 2017's Yeti: The Ecology of a Mystery, say that the most likely culprits are a mother bear and her cub:

"In every case you will find that all yeti footprints were made by the Himalayan black bear, Ursus thibetanus."

He also explained how a bear would be able to make footprints that large, noting that mother bears produce overprints, which happen when her front foot goes down and the back foot goes down on the same spot.

The length of the footprint can be explained by the baby cub that "hops behind the mother." That, and snow melting along the edges of the print create the effect we see.

ADG PI has been ridiculed since it shared the tweet to its official social media account, with at least one person urging the agency to delete the tweet altogether to save India from "international embarrassment"...

...at least one person bringing in a healthy dose of skepticism...

...and others just in this game for laughs.




The Nepalese government has been a good sport about the whole Yeti thing, issuing hunting licenses in the 1960s to those who wanted to have a shot at capturing the legendary beast.

Genetic research published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B in 2017 found that nine bone, tooth, skin, hair and fecal samples attributed to the Yeti came from Asian black bears, Himalayan brown bears or Tibetan brown bears, with one sample even coming from a dog.

Christmas is upon us. It's time to get those Christmas present lists together.

So... who has been naughty and who has been nice?

Who is getting diamonds and who is getting coal? Yuck, coal. Is that even a thing anymore? Who even started that idea?

There has to be some funnier or more "for the times" type of "you've been naughty" stocking stuffer.

I feel like the statement coal used to make is kind of last century at this point.

Apparently I'm not alone in this thinking.

Keep reading... Show less

I admit, I love my stuffed animals. They're the best.

Some of them have been with me for years and I have them proudly displayed in different spots around my apartment. And when I've packed them for a move, I've done so with all the tender loving care I can muster.

What is it about them that stirs up these feelings?

Believe it or not, it's quite possible to form emotional attachments to inanimate objects!

Keep reading... Show less
Nik Shulaihin/Unsplash

They say your 30's hits different, like one day you're young a hopeful and the next day you're just WAY too old for this.

What is the "this" you're suddenly too old for?

No idea. It's different for everyone, but make no mistake, it'll happen to you too.

Maybe it already has?

Giphy

Keep reading... Show less

Do all mothers go to the say mom school or something? Because they seem to share the same advice or go on the same platitudes, don't they?

Here's an idea.

Maybe they're just older, have more experience, and are trying to keep us from being dumbasses in public. At least, that's what I think.

I'm definitely grateful for my mother's advice—it's saved me more than once—and it seems many out there are too. And they all seem to have heard the same things from their mothers, too.

Keep reading... Show less