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Folks love a good urban legend. A scary story to tell in the dark.

There are whole collections of urban legends. There are webpages dedicated to finding out whether or not urban legends are true or false.

Society loves them.


u/Milfhuntersplash asked:

What's your Favorite Cryptid or Urban Legends?

Here were some of those answers.


Choo Choo

One urban legend that really sticks to me for whatever reason is the Baby Train. Basically, the story tells of a town with an abnormally high birth rate. The reason for this is because the town is located near a railroad where a train passes by at 5 AM and its whistle wakes up all of the residents. Because its too early to get up but too late to go back to sleep, couples will "do it" to pass the time.

AlanisStout

2 Spoopy

I grew up in Hawaii hearing stories about the Night Marchers as a kid. You would always hear stories about seeing the band of worries at night or the beat of their drums. It was some seriously spooky stuff as a kid.

Sir_Regas

Awooooooo

Dogmen. Basically werewolves, but there is an entire podcast with 200+ episodes where people talk about their actual encounters with them, aptly called Dogman Encounters.

There is also a midieval religious treatise called "do the dog headed men have souls?" That discusses in length whether the dog headed men have souls, talking about them very matter-of-factly.

knowssleep

And That's A No From Me

The native American legend of the skinwalkers has always fascinated me. I believe I had an encounter with one when my Dad and I were camping. Ever since then I've never felt completely safe outdoors. That was the last time my dad went outside without a gun.

Chonky_Boi_563

Onryo Or Nah Bro

I've always liked Mexican and Japanese urban legends. One is a japanese legend called Teke Teke. How she came to be differs, but it all ends up in her turning into a ghost. The one I first heard about was that she was a very shy girl and got scared very easily. So one night heading home with her friends going to the train tracks, they decided to pull a prank on her and put a bug on her shoulder. She then fell onto the train tracks and was cut in half horizontally.

She now became a vengeful spirit and roams the train tracks/railroads in Japan at night, wielding a scythe or another weapon that she can use to cut you the same way she was cut in half. It is said she is now as fast as the train that killed her and if you somehow escape from her and she notices you, you will die within 3 days. She is called Teke Teke because she travels on her elbows and they make a "teke teke" sound.

theboi555

Wee Ones

In far northern Canada some small villages that have seasons of 24/7 darkness have stories of "the little people". Basically small humanoid creatures that will kidnap children in the dark. I believe the stories were created to keep children from wondering into the cold and dark and getting lost.

PossumTaco

Whoosh

The Jersey Devil.

I know he's supposed to be in south Jersey, but I had an experience in Sussex County. There is an abandoned town called Walpack that my wife and I were exploring at night. There is one part with a meadow/clearing that has a tree that looks like Rafiki's tree from the Lion King right in the center. Well, we were by that tree when suddenly something the size of a damn horse swooped down and flew over us. It was not an owl. We ran as fast as we could outta there.

Jersey Devil is real folks.

CorkyButchek

These Are All Terrifying

There's a few

Skinwalkers

The SCP Foundation (Love the toaster, the Vending Machine, and the Monster that teleports you to the ocean to eat you SCP:1128).

The Psycho Banging the boyfriend's severed head on the car roof

The Shivering Cactus

Human's can lick too/Drip Drip Drip I've heard them together and as separate stories

Goatman of Anansi I think its called

Golden-Sun

Cocoman

The cocoman/el cuco/the boogeyman is an awesome urban legend that takes place in multiple countries and cultures across the planet. Stephen King recently wrote a cool book about it that was made into an amazing HBO show. I heard about "the cocoman" from my parents and grandparents growing up so it was really cool and eerie seeing it on TV.

Von_Chubb

Not Candyman

I am brasilian and in some states there is a urban legend called The Matuto, he isn't that scary but the story is kinda cool.

If you go to a place with a mirror at 3:00 am, turns off all the lights nearby, stand backward to the mirror and count the seconds until one minute pass (3:00 to 3:01, 3:01 to 3:02 or 3:02 to 3:03 don't work after this) and exactly when the minute pass you turn on the light and turn yourself around. Then you will see yourself turning around 1 or 2 seconds late the one you will see at the mirror won't be you will be the Matuto then he will be behind you until the end of your life.

Czar732

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

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