JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

The body is an amazing thing, capable of extraordinary possibilities. We often tend to ignore our bodies, which is a ludicrous thing to do. The more we know about our bodies, the longer we can keep them functioning at 100%. Everything is connected, so everything functions as a whole to keep us breathing and strong. So let's figure out the things that we don't know that we most definitely should.

Redditor u/alwaysclimbing5 wanted to learn a few things about anatomy by asking.... What's a cool fact about the human body that a lot of people don't know?


Green Ending...

Giphy

If you drink nothing but purple Powerade for 3 days straight you poop will turn neon green. EnderOfHope

Bone in the Eye.....

The bone that supports your eyeball, called the orbital floor, is paper thin and has a large empty cavity, called the maxillary sinus, on the opposite side. When you get hit hard in the eyeball, instead of your eyeball itself rupturing, the bone underneath your eye breaks, which is called an orbital floor fracture.

This releases the pressure from the impact and saves your eyeball. If you crush a beachball against a concrete wall, you can pop it, but if you try crush it against a styrofoam wall, the wall breaks but the beachball is fine. An amazing evolutionary adaptation to protect your eyesight. ddsmd

Extra Ribs for Free....

Some people are born with extra ribs called cervical ribs which grow from the C7 vertebrae in the neck. It's a weird and rare mutation that a lot of people don't even know they have, although it is also a cause of thoracic outlet syndrome, which is where pressure is applied to the nerves, veins and arteries running into the arms. It can be really painful, and in some rare cases can cause gangrene in the arms. If left untreated it can kill you if you're really unlucky. (source: I have the non-cervical rib induced variety) WinterF19

The Amazing Brain....

Really late but I discovered this thing during my thesis.

We were researching patients with neurological problems and people who had brain injuries and we found a woman in her 30 that had had part of her brain removed. More specifically the area that activates when you move your body.

Well she was moving and talking with just some minor missteps and theoretically it was not possible, she was paralyzed in the first 3 months after the operation (she was caught in a car accident if I remember correctly).

We were trying out a new scanner for the brain and we found out that an area of the brain that wasn't supposed to work and control the movement was doing just that. The occipital area (usually controls the vision) was now working as a motor control area.

The brain is really amazing... yourteam

Body Bomb.

Giphy

You have enough potassium in your body to create a very small bomb. Devilblis

The Q-Tip....

Some people will cough if they put something in one ear, a very small percentage will cough if something is in either ear. It is called Arnold's ear-cough reflex. ArtEclectic

I always cough when I q-tip out my ears! I thought that happened for everyone! When I swab it out I can feel the tickle way deep in my throat. ldobehardcore

Liver Phoenix!

Your liver can regenerate, and much faster than you think. I had a quarter of my liver removed, and a month later it was back. Rock_Robster__

Idk that's about exactly as fast as I want my liver to regenerate. rubywolf27

The Smell of Rain. 

You know the smell of rain, or disturbed soil? It's a compound produced by bacteria called Geosmin, and the human nose is extremely sensitive to it. We can smell it at as low a concentration as 5 parts per trillion. Nonions

We can smell rain better then sharks can smell blood. I actually just learned about this. There Is a podcast from Stuff You Should Know that goes over all this info. The smell of rain. Yellowbellies2

Palm Facing.... Up

There is a muscle, called palmaris longus, in the forearm missing in about 10% of the population. You can easy test if you have it by putting your pinky and thumb together, while holding your palm facing up, and flex the hand upwards. If 1 tendon is standing out more than the others that's palmaris longus. johigangan

The Cerebellum...

Giphy

A woman was found without a cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls motor abilities of the body. She is alive, and has no real side effects from this condition that we know of.

EDIT: Okay to clarify, her cerebellum was not removed nor did I do it. She was born without one, and the medical professionals (Again, not me) found out after she complained about a headache which lead to an MRI. HarryShachar

REDDIT

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


Keep reading... Show less
Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


Keep reading... Show less