The Netflix docu-series Making a Murderer followed the parallel stories of Steven Avery and his nephew Brendan Dassey, who were both imprisoned for life for the murder of 25-year-old photographer Teresa Halbech. Throughout the show's 10-episode run, filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos explained the theory that Avery and/or Dassey were coerced into their confessions, resulting in their unjust imprisonment.

Following the series's huge success, Netflix has announced it will return for a second season on October 19!


Ricciardi and Demos released a statement on the second season, saying:

Steven and Brendan, their families and their legal and investigative teams have once again graciously granted us access, giving us a window into the complex web of American criminal justice.

This is unsurprising, considering that the massive influx of public interest in Dassey's case resulted in a 2016 judge overturning his conviction, though later rehearings would rule against him, keeping Dassey in prison.


The directors are eager to continue exploring new sides of the criminal justice system:

Building on Part 1, which documented the experience of the accused, in Part 2, we have chronicled the experience of the convicted and imprisoned, two men each serving life sentences for crimes they maintain they did not commit. We are thrilled to be able to share this new phase of the journey with viewers.

Twitter was even more eager to start watching, like RIGHT NOW:



Fans truly couldn't contain themselves!




Finally, the TV we've all been waiting for...



Making a Murderer: Part 2, is coming to Netflix in a few short weeks!


H/T - Buzzfeed, Hollywood Reporter

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