The American dollar might not take the average person in the United States very far, but it can go the distance depending where you are overseas. It's a big reason why many people become expats, actually, finding that they can enjoy a higher quality of life on significantly less.

After Redditor molonu asked the online community, "What are some things $100 USD can get you in the world's poorest country?" people revealed just how far that kind of money can really go.


"I'm from Nicaragua..."

I'm from Nicaragua, the poorest country in Latin America.

$100 was my rent for a tiny apartment, bathroom, internet, water and electricity included.

[deleted]

"My first time in the Philippines..."

I've been to the Philippines two times and $100 can get you quite a lot.

My first time in the Philippines it got my friend and I a cottage next to the sea, free meals (or sometimes a little more for 30 cents), scuba gear and red horse so cheap that I nearly got addicted to the stuff. We probably only spent 50 dollars max during our time on that island. Helps that my friend was Filipino so he knew vacation spots that the locals go to.

Second time I went to Puerto Princesa and took a $12 five hour bus ride to El Nido. Over the course of a week and a half I think I must have spent $300 max and that's with loads of alcohol and food involved.

One of the most beautiful countries I've ever been to and with some of the nicest people to boot. I'm definitely hoping to visit again someday and would highly recommend it to anyone who can go.

komnenos

"I have been to North Korea..."

I have been to North Korea and $100 can get you quite some food in the "privileged supermarket" reserved for the political elites. I was able to buy soft drinks made in North Korea for like $2.

However, if you are not part of the political elite, showing that you have $100 will land you into a gulag because owning foreign currency is illegal.

bustead

In Vietnam, $100 can get you 500 draft beers (Bia Hoi) on Hanoi's beer street.

deuce3k

"A bribe..."

In Cambodia: A bribe to get a drivers license, fake any legal work, 200 bowls of noodles (@2000 riel each), a VIP status at a bar and drinks all night, 400 pastries, etc.

DamianDrake96

"It's around..."

Giphy

Soooooo much good beer in the chezch republic and Hungary. It's around 39 cents American for a really good beer.

pauladeenlovesbutter

"You can usually..."

With $100, you could live comfortably for a week or two in many Southeast Asian countries (Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia), especially if you're OK with bunking in hostels ($5-10/night). Street markets are incredibly inexpensive; a few bucks is more than sufficient to both tingle your taste buds and achieve sexy satiation. Transportation is also super affordable: You can usually reach any local destination for under $2 US.

Punliners

"I bought almost every meal..."

I went to Chiapas, Mexico and spent $100 in five days (stayed with a friend and my flight was $300 from LAX). I bought almost every meal, entry to museums, guided tours at Mayan ruins, and multiple bus trips. In addition I stayed one night at an eco lodge in the rainforest with a beautiful pool for $80, all meals included!

ineedthisbook110

"It was way more than enough..."

When I went to Bulgaria, $100 equaled about $200 in their currency. It was way more than enough for a weeks worth of eating, and going out, as well as cab rides around the city. My whole month long trip I only spent about $300 US.

floridas_lostboy

"I bought dinner..."

I bought dinner (a main and a soft drink) for around 35 people in the office, in India, for that much.

andrew_a7

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