JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Getty Images

Your parents might not be the world's nicest people. They might be difficult to trust. In fact, there might not be any trust there at all.

Your parents might be the world's nicest people. They're amazing people to trust, but you wouldn't want to risk hurting them (and what they don't know won't hurt them, correct?).

"What's the biggest secret you've kept from your parents?" –– This was today's burning question from Redditor l1quid_nurgget, who reminded us that many of us do indeed have reasons for our secrecy.


"I make more money..."

I make more money than I let on. My parents have and will always be the "I take care of you all your life, time for you to pay it back" type of parent. Except there is no end to this "debt". So I hide money from them so they can't take advantage of me.

Nagaisbae

"I met the guy..."

I met the guy my mom told me was my real father. We did a DNA test and there is a 0% chance. He even took me on a white water rafting trip with his wife and son. I've never told her.

the_nightcourt

"That I used to sneak out..."

That I used to sneak out of the house from our second story bathroom window to go nightclubbing with my friends after my parents went to bed.

Vyzantinist

"I am fully aware..."

I am fully aware of my father's extramarital affairs.

zeronotzero

"My parents..."

My parents divorced when I was eight. My dad left, and I never saw much of him. Among other issues, he came out to my brother and I before they divorced. I never told my mother that he was gay. My father passed in 2011, my mother in 2017. I think she had an idea, but we never discussed it. He was born in 1945, before such a thing was accepted, and attempted at 'passing.'

Merkle85

"My location..."

My location for the past 25 years.

Metatron_Fallen

"That my sister..."

That my sister is gay. She openly admits it to everyone, except for my family. She opened up to me, eventually but both my parents and older brother don't know about it. Since then we've become a lot closer than when we were kids.

vkuma

"Parents are..."

Parents are (and raised me to be) staunch Mormon. (For those unfamiliar, Mormons believe their church is the only true church on Earth.)

I don't believe it's true. They think I still go, but it's infrequent at best.

TheCardgageCurse

"That I'm not going..."

That I'm not going to finish my degree and I've paid off my student loans. My degree was pointless and I don't do well in school due to my ADHD. My dad constantly asks when I'm going to finish and stop bartending...I just say soon. I hate disappointing them because my Dad gets very proud of my sister and I with our accomplishments...but truth be told, I'm quite content with the 60k I make bartending. My degree would've only pulled 35k starting.

absurdapple

"They are very conservative..."

I lived with my girlfriend / fiancé for ~1.5 years in a house ~45 minutes from where my parents lived prior to us being married. They are very conservative and would have likely not attended the wedding had they known.

atlienk

Pixabay

Knowing how to comfort someone is a skill that not everybody has. In fact, some of us outright suck at it.

It doesn't make you a bad person - maybe you're awkward under pressure, or uncomfortable, or didn't have healthy models of empathy. Maybe you just panic and don't know what to do.

Keep reading... Show less

Manipulation is designed to be stealthy. We hardly recognize it when it's happening to us because our abuser has forced it to appear under wraps.

But when we recognize it for what it really is, we really feel like we've been smacked across the face. There is no other descriptor for it. Usually we've trusted and loved those that manipulated us.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Anita S. from Pixabay

Just as new mothers encounter the sudden, influential developments of powerful hormone changes, protective instincts, and milk production, so new fathers undergo some key changes of their own.

Their socks become exclusively white, climbing higher up the calf than ever before. All their shorts sprout cargo pockets and clunky belt loop cell phone holders. They start to really lean in to their old records.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Patricia Srigley from Pixabay

Cleaning up is hard enough when it's just clearing a month of dust bunnies. Can you imagine cleaning the debris left by murder, suicide and violence? I have a really great friend who used to do crime scene clean-up for a living. The pay is incredible; it starts at $55 an hour. But there is a much higher cost in mental well being. Death affects you in ways you don't always feel immediately. My friend has stories of nightmares, depression and pain after leaving scenes of horror. Why make all that money just to spend it on therapy? It takes a certain type of person.

***TRIGGER WARNING. CONTENTS ARE SENSITIVE ***

Redditor u/MemegodDave wanted to hear from the people who have the stomach to come in after crime and tragedy

to try to bring back some form of normalcy to the location by asking... People who make their living out of cleaning murder scenes, accidents and the like, what is the worst thing you have experienced in your career?

Keep reading... Show less