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Synesthesia is a physiological condition where one of your senses relates to another sense or part of the body by stimulation of another sense or part of the body. The first recorded case of this phenomenon that we know of dates back to 1690, when a blind man said he experienced the color scarlet upon hearing the sound of a trumpet.

A woman took to Twitter to tell people what their names taste like. The responses were interesting, to say the least.


Julie McDowall is a synesthete who lives in Glasgow, Scotland.

"Ask me what your name tastes like, she proposed.

Of course, McDowall was asked what her own name tastes like:

The answer to that is um, distressing.

Mike wanted to know what his name tastes like:

And lo and behold:

But there's a catch here:

And you bet it does:

Then there's Craig:

Who tastes like:

And then there's Emily:

Who tastes like:

https://twitter.com/JulieAMcDowall/status/1089928959423406081

And Antonio:

Who tastes like (awww):

Stephen was in for a surprise.

He likely never dreamed he'd taste like:

Are you curious about what your name tastes like? You might as well throw it out there. There's no harm in asking.

Years ago a young woman told me about her grandmother, who had survived a home invasion in South Africa. It was a very unsettling story. Her grandmother was never the same afterward and became consumed by paranoia. There is something so horrible about having your home violated like that, of feeling like you'll never be safe again, even in a space that's supposed to be your sanctuary from the outside world. The young woman confessed that the thought of going through something similar continues to scare the hell out of her and honestly, I can't blame her. It's a frightening thought.

After Redditor Kingofthelosers asked the online community, "What are you terribly afraid of?" people shared their stories.

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Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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