JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Getty Images

If you found the world's oldest message in a bottle, what might be inside? Got to be something cool or mysterious, right? Like a shipwrecked pirate's last will and testament, or perhaps the insane ramblings of a desperate castaway trapped on an island.

Turns out real life is a bit less dramatic. Australians Tonya and Kym Illman happened upon the bottle a few months back, but its mysterious message had nothing to do with pirate lore, castaways or even that catchy song by Sting and The Police from the late 1970s.

After taking home the bottle and fishing out its contents, the married couple found a small note that resembled a rolled up cigarette. Instead of smoking it, they popped the note into the oven to "dry up the moisture," which revealed a cryptic ledger.

They later found out the ledger was from an experiment of sorts that the German Naval Observatory had conducted over 132 years ago. The details aren't exactly thrilling, but apparently the experiment was supposed to track shipping routes and ocean currents. According to one tweet, anyone who found a bottle was offered a small payment to return it to the German Naval Observatory for further analysis.

The dusty old bottle captured the imagination of a few on social media:



While many celebrated the historic find in Western Australia, others mocked and derided the bottle's anti-climactic message:


Sure, the message wasn't all that cool, like a pirate king giving us directions to the bones of his enemies and heaps of buried treasure. But, at least that nice couple got a certificate from the Guinness Book of World Records! That's cool, right? Anyone?


The moral of the story is that you never know what you might come across in this world. And the next time someone finds a message in a bottle, maybe it will lead us somewhere amazing, like Davey Jones's locker. Anything's possible!

H/T: Thrillist, BBC

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

Keep reading... Show less