JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Donald Kravitz / Contributor / Getty Images / @themadisonc/Twitter

For the first time ever, Miss America, Miss USA, and Miss Teen USA are all black women.

After a history rife with racism and exclusion, it is a breath of fresh air to see black women competing and succeeding in the pageant world.


Attorney Cheslie Kryst, was crowned Miss USA on May 2nd, 2019. 28-year-old Kryst works full-time as an attorney doing civil litigation, and volunteers her time (pro bono work) representing prison inmates who have received unjustly harsh sentences.

You can view her crowning below:

Miss USA 2019 Crowning Moment youtu.be

Kaliegh Garris, crowned Miss Teen USA, is a competitive dancer, in addition to attending two schools.

The 18-year-old is enrolled at both the Joseph A. Foran High School and the Educational Center for the Arts in Milford, Connecticut.

MISS teen USA 2019 CROWNING MOMENT youtu.be

Nia Franklin was crowned Miss America 2019 back in September.

Franklin, 25, is a music composer and classically trained opera singer who graduated with a Masters in Fine Arts degree from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in 2017.

She is passionate about using her voice and her art to reach and enrich people's lives. While attending university, she was a member of ArtistCorps, which places artists in public schools to enrich students' education.

Newly crowned Miss America Nia Franklin speaks out on 'GMA' youtu.be

In the not-so-distant past, black women were barred from competing in mainstream beauty pageants.

These three ladies follow in the footsteps of actress Vanessa Williams, who was the first black woman to win the Miss America beauty pageant in 1983.

There was an outpouring of support on Twitter for the three newly-crowned queens.





Even Halle Berry, actress and former pageant contestant, congratulated the women.

Franklin told the New York Times how important the three wins are.

"It is important to little brown and black girls to see three strong figures, three strong women, African-American women that are doing so much great work."
"People will argue that race doesn't matter. But race does matter in America, because of the history, because of slavery."

Manipulation is designed to be stealthy. We hardly recognize it when it's happening to us because our abuser has forced it to appear under wraps.

But when we recognize it for what it really is, we really feel like we've been smacked across the face. There is no other descriptor for it. Usually we've trusted and loved those that manipulated us.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Anita S. from Pixabay

Just as new mothers encounter the sudden, influential developments of powerful hormone changes, protective instincts, and milk production, so new fathers undergo some key changes of their own.

Their socks become exclusively white, climbing higher up the calf than ever before. All their shorts sprout cargo pockets and clunky belt loop cell phone holders. They start to really lean in to their old records.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Patricia Srigley from Pixabay

Cleaning up is hard enough when it's just clearing a month of dust bunnies. Can you imagine cleaning the debris left by murder, suicide and violence? I have a really great friend who used to do crime scene clean-up for a living. The pay is incredible; it starts at $55 an hour. But there is a much higher cost in mental well being. Death affects you in ways you don't always feel immediately. My friend has stories of nightmares, depression and pain after leaving scenes of horror. Why make all that money just to spend it on therapy? It takes a certain type of person.

***TRIGGER WARNING. CONTENTS ARE SENSITIVE ***

Redditor u/MemegodDave wanted to hear from the people who have the stomach to come in after crime and tragedy

to try to bring back some form of normalcy to the location by asking... People who make their living out of cleaning murder scenes, accidents and the like, what is the worst thing you have experienced in your career?

Keep reading... Show less

We all know the telltale signs that something is making us uncomfortable. Suddenly, we begin shaking, either in our hands or knees or toes. Then, usually, sweat starts pouring out of every part of our body, making it look like we just ran through a rainstorm underneath a waterfall. Finally, we lose our regular speech functions. Everything goes out of sync and our words don't match up to what's in our minds.

What's interesting is that what usually brings about these fits of uncomfortableness differs from person to person, as evidenced by the stories below.

Keep reading... Show less