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Some of the families of victims from the Sandy Hook shooting saw some justice served on Friday when they won a legal battle against InfoWars' Alex Jones.


Six families were involved in the suit against Jones. Four of those families had children in the shooting and two had loved ones who served as educators at the school.

According to The Daily Beast, the families sued Jones for defamation.

They accused him of encouraging the:

"monstrous, unspeakable lie: that the Sandy Hook shooting was staged and that the families who lost loved ones that day are actors who faked their relatives' deaths."
ABC News also reported that:
"Jones' actions subjected the families and survivors of the Sandy Hook shooting to physical confrontations and harassment, death threats and personal attacks on social media."

On Friday, a judge in Connecticut granted the plaintiffs their request which included access into Infowars' internal marketing and financial documents.

This ruling gives the families access to any and all communications Jones had about the 2012 massacre in Newtown, Connecticut.

One of the attorneys representing the families, Chris Mattei, stated:

"From the beginning, we have alleged that Alex Jones and his financial network trafficked in lies and hate in order to profit from the grief of Sandy Hook families. That is what we intend to prove, and today's ruling advances that effort."

The ruling is a clear victory for the grieving families, and the internet is thrilled that they are seeing some justice for Jones' insensitive and hurtful rhetoric.










Jones sought to dismiss the lawsuit.

After the ruling his attorney, Jay M. Wolman, stated:

"Plaintiffs suffered a horrible tragedy. Alex Jones and Infowars are not responsible for this tragedy. To punish them for First Amendment protected speech on this matter of public concern will not bring back the lives lost."
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