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Bailey Jean Matheson was only 35 years old when she passed away from leiomyosarcoma, a rare cancer that affects muscle tissue.

But in an unusual move, Matheson had penned her own obituary, which her parents had published on her behalf.


Matheson, from Halifax, Nova Scotia, began her obituary with a nod to her parents.

"To my parents, thank you for supporting me and my decisions throughout my life. I always remember my mom saying losing a child would be the hardest loss a parent could go through."



"My parents gave me the greatest gift of supporting my decisions with not going through chemo and just letting me live the rest of my life the way I believed it should be. I know how hard that must have been watching me stop treatment and letting nature take its course. I love you both even more for this."

She continued with a tribute to her friends and boyfriend.

"To my friends, being an only child, I've always cherished my friendships more than anything because I've never had siblings of my own. I never thought I could love my friends more than I did but going through this and having your unconditional love and support you have made something that is normally so hard, more bearable and peaceful. Thank you and I love you all so much.




"To my Brent, you came into my life just three months before my diagnosis. You had no idea what you were getting yourself into when you swiped right that day. I couldn't have asked for a better man to be by my side for all the adventures, appointments, laughs, cries and breakdowns. You are an amazing person and anyone in your life is so fortunate to know you. I love you beyond words."

Past the loving tributes, she included one poignant quote that everyone is reflecting on.

"Don't take the small stuff so seriously and live a little."








According to the New York Post, Matheson took full advantage of the time she had left by traveling to "more than a dozen countries, spanning the globe from Ireland to St. Lucia."

"Thank you for all the support, donations, fundraisers, food, messages and calls over the past two years. It means the world to me."





"In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Melanie's Way or Young Adults Cancer Canada."

Rest in peace, Bailey.

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