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If you come at the Queen, you best not miss. Halsey, the singer behind "Closer" and "Bad at Love," got called out on Twitter for resembling the stereotypical image of a "manic pixie dream girl," a term used in film circles to describe a female love interest who "exists solely in the fevered imaginations of sensitive writer-directors to teach broodingly soulful young men to embrace life and its infinite mysteries and adventures." Some examples of the MPDG include Natalie Portman's character in Garden State, and Kirsten Dunst's character in Elizabethtown.

What the Twitter jokester probably didn't expect, however, was for Halsey herself to shoot him a reply!


When @badboyblues cracked this joke on Twitter, he probably wasn't imagining it would go very far:


Somehow though, the tweet found its way to Halsey herself, who replied in a self-deprecating fashion:


Halsey fans on Twitter loved the exchange!





Stars making fun of themselves is always fun to see.





Some fans thought they'd try the ritual so they could meet their hero. I mean, it probably isn't going to work, but why not take a chance?





One fan asked Halsey what was the problem with Doc Martens , to which she charmingly responded:

Nothing lmao! everything I named is things I love. I'm self aware enough to know when a meme / drag about me is true hahahaha.

Though she's self-deprecating in silly moments, Halsey is also well-known for standing up for herself online if she feels the issue is important. The star, who is bisexual, has written about bi-erasure on several occasions. In December 2017, she posted this message:

So if I'm dating a guy I'm straight, and if I date a woman, I'm a lesbian. The only way to be a #True bisexual is to date 2 people at once.

Halsey's fans are amplifying her message to the world!






The lesson Halsey has taught us? Lean into who you really are, no matter who that is.



H/T - Pink News, Twitter

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

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The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

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