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According to China Daily, a joint research group from China and the United States recently published a paper in the National Science Review on their findings from using gene-editing techniques to make rhesus macaques with a human gene related to brain development.


The result was macaques with better short-term memory and faster response times, but slower brain development.

The gene in question, MCPH1, affects fetal brain development in humans and relates to brain size.

To have the human gene affect the monkeys, researchers exposed the embryos to viruses containing the gene.

The New York Post cited Bing Su, geneticist at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, led the study as commenting:

"This was the first attempt to understand the evolution of human cognition using a transgenic monkey model."

When you compare humans to primates, our brains take much longer to develop. This leads to our prolonged childhoods, which are quite unique among animals.

Though the development of the brain in the genetically altered monkeys took longer, their brains were no bigger than usual.

Genetically altering monkeys with human DNA has led to significant backlash from the greater scientific community.

James Sikela, from the University of Colorado, stated:

"The use of transgenic monkeys to study human genes linked to brain evolution is a very risky road to take."
"It is a classic slippery slope issue and one that we can expect to recur as this type of research is pursued."

Jacqueline Glover, also of the University of Colorado, commented on how the public will likely see the study:

"You just go to the Planet of the Apes immediately in the popular imagination."
"To humanize them is to cause harm. Where would they live and what would they do? Do not create a being that can't have a meaningful life in any context."

And Planet of the Apes was exactly where some people went on Twitter when learning of the study.




Others commented on the ethical implications.


Animal experimentation is already a hotly debated issue in the scientific community. Experiments that involve exposing animals to human genes are even more so.

Making animals more human seems like a recipe for potential disaster.

Manipulation is designed to be stealthy. We hardly recognize it when it's happening to us because our abuser has forced it to appear under wraps.

But when we recognize it for what it really is, we really feel like we've been smacked across the face. There is no other descriptor for it. Usually we've trusted and loved those that manipulated us.

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Image by Anita S. from Pixabay

Just as new mothers encounter the sudden, influential developments of powerful hormone changes, protective instincts, and milk production, so new fathers undergo some key changes of their own.

Their socks become exclusively white, climbing higher up the calf than ever before. All their shorts sprout cargo pockets and clunky belt loop cell phone holders. They start to really lean in to their old records.

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Image by Patricia Srigley from Pixabay

Cleaning up is hard enough when it's just clearing a month of dust bunnies. Can you imagine cleaning the debris left by murder, suicide and violence? I have a really great friend who used to do crime scene clean-up for a living. The pay is incredible; it starts at $55 an hour. But there is a much higher cost in mental well being. Death affects you in ways you don't always feel immediately. My friend has stories of nightmares, depression and pain after leaving scenes of horror. Why make all that money just to spend it on therapy? It takes a certain type of person.

***TRIGGER WARNING. CONTENTS ARE SENSITIVE ***

Redditor u/MemegodDave wanted to hear from the people who have the stomach to come in after crime and tragedy

to try to bring back some form of normalcy to the location by asking... People who make their living out of cleaning murder scenes, accidents and the like, what is the worst thing you have experienced in your career?

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We all know the telltale signs that something is making us uncomfortable. Suddenly, we begin shaking, either in our hands or knees or toes. Then, usually, sweat starts pouring out of every part of our body, making it look like we just ran through a rainstorm underneath a waterfall. Finally, we lose our regular speech functions. Everything goes out of sync and our words don't match up to what's in our minds.

What's interesting is that what usually brings about these fits of uncomfortableness differs from person to person, as evidenced by the stories below.

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