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The 71-year-old actor took to Twitter to give an English lesson on pronouns but instead he got an epic schooling courtesy of Dictionary.com


Much like the President he supports noted Hollywood conservative James Woods is often prone to bouts of ill-advised and bigoted Twitter ranting.

From calling Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez the most dangerous person in America to branding fictional gay characters as indecent, Woods' feed is a quagmire of mindless liberal criticism and endless conservative screeching.

But a recent transphobic sermon from Woods about the proper use of pronouns caught the eye of the wordsmiths over at Dictionary.com who felt compelled to point out that Woods' thinly veiled transphobia was more than just bad manners.

"Please join me in using proper grammar, syntax, and spelling," Woods began on Twitter.
"The correct pronoun usage in the English language is 'he' for a singular male and 'she' for a singular female. 'They' is used for the plural of either males, females, or both. Don't be bullied by hare-brained liberals."


Fortunately the folks at Dictionary.com decide to take the time to point out how Woods was entirely wrong.

Dictionary.com posted:

"They has been in use as a singular pronoun since the 1300s. Among its best known users in history: Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Jane Austen."


It was a savage lesson in both English and humility, and Twitter was loving it.






People even threw in their own examples of just how wrong Woods was.




Even though it may fall on deaf ears when it comes to those who think like Woods, or don't think at all, many were still grateful that Dictionary was getting the word out there.




Hopefully Woods at least learned not to hide his transphobia behind grammar lessons.

If he wants to try again though he better look for another language.


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