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David Crotty/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images; @chrissyteigen/Twitter

Earlier this week, we all heard the news about the college admissions scam perpetrated by dozens of prominent actors and CEOs to get their kids into prestigious schools by bribing test proctors, cheating on school work and falsifying photos of the kids as athletes.

That last one seems so far out there, it's one of the most talked about aspects of the scam (outside of the involvement of Aunt Becky from Full House).


To that end, Chrissy Teigen has taken to Twitter to mock the situation.

While her kids are a few years away from needing to worry about college, Teigen attempts to get herself, her husband, and their friends into Harvard. She shows the athletic prowess of the four in a series of totally unaltered photos.

The photos show the faces of Teigen, John Legend, Jena Atkin and Mike Rosenthal pasted onto the bodies of famous football (soccer) players.

They are varying levels of successful.

Honestly? I'd totally believe they're on the team.




The indictments in the college admissions scam allege that for the past several years, Rick Singer had an entire network of test proctors, coaches, athletic administrators and, of course, parents whose bribery and fraud allowed them to secure admissions for students to high ranking schools such as Yale, Georgetown and Stanford.

While actors Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, the latter of whom played Aunt Becky in Full House, are the most famous of the parents charged, the list includes Gordon Caplan, chairman of a law firm; Robert Flaxman, the CEO of Crown Realty; and Mossimo Giannulli, Loughlin's husband and the founder of Mossimo Fashion company.

While there's always been hushed talk and jokes about the country's elite using their wealth and status to secure their kids entrance to these schools, no one expected law enforcement to actually do something about it, let alone find such a blatant scam as posed photos for athletic admissions.

It's great that Teigen can help lighten the mood.




Still, the FBI has stated that while some of the kids knew about the scam and willingly participated, others were sheltered and had no idea. They had to find out they didn't get into these schools on their own merit when this story broke.

The crimes of these parents have also proven that the admissions process for colleges is fundamentally broken, in a day and age when college has become a near necessity to get ahead, while also becoming the most expensive purchase a child has to decide on.

While it's great to be able to have a laugh, we have to remember the sadness at the heart of the humor.




As the investigation continues and more fallout from the scam plays out, there's going to be a lot of blame going around and a lot of tense emotions over these actions.

At the very least some great jokes can keep us from getting too grim.

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