AP Entertainment / Twitter

The Oscars were full of fun surprises this year, but surely among the favorites was the South Korean film, Parasite, winning Best Picture.

Add to this the child star's adorable reaction to the film winning, and it's sweet moment that's sure to be mentioned at future Oscars to come.


Ten-year-old Jung Hyeon-jun was the lead child start in the tragicomedy film, Parasite, that took South Korean cinema by storm earlier this year before taking American cinema by enthusiastic surprise.

Hyeon-jun made his debut on South Korean television programs such as "You Are Too Much," "Vagabond," and "Through the Waves." Parasite was his first casting in a feature film, and he's coming into success quickly because of it.

The film went on to be nominated at the Oscars for six different categories, and it managed to win four of them. The two favorite wins appeared to be Bong Joon Ho's win for Best Director, and of course the film making it to Best Picture.

Hyeon-jun unfortunately was too young to attend the Oscars in-person, but he was able to watch the ceremony on his television at home, where AP Entertainment appeared to film his reaction to the win that was coming.

When Parasite was announced as the winner for Best Picture, Hyeon-jun had the sweetest, most enthusiastic reaction from his couch. He was sitting at full attention, waiting to hear the news, and then like the ten-year-old he is, he collapsed into giggles, did a quick happy dance, and quickly collapsed back on the couch in pure joy.

You can watch his reaction here:

Hyeon-jun said of the win:

"I thought it would be awesome to get it, and we actually won the award!"

He also shared his dreams for future stardom and how they already seem to be coming true:

"I am wondering if I am in heaven. I think I was born to receive an Oscar."

Fans were taken by Hyeon-jun's adorable reaction to his film's win and took a moment to celebrate the raw jubilation kids are the best at showing.



Parasite winning Best Picture is a major development for the Oscars, and certainly sets expectations high for future award seasons.

We'll be curious to see which movie wins next year, and even more curious to see if Hyeon-jun is involved in any of the big winners next year.

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