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The word "triggered" is misused and thrown around a bit too freely these days.

A prime example of this was when Twitter user @themagicmuir, aka Ciara, tweeted about what it means to be a true friend.


Actual triggering refers to survivors of trauma with PTSD, people with anxiety disorders, people with obsessive compulsive disorder, people with sensory processing disorders or people on the Autism spectrum having involuntary reactions to certain situations or stimuli. As part of treatment, they're counseled to identify and develop strategies for dealing with their triggers.

But much of the cultural landscape has coopted the term, trivializing the experiences of those with clinical or medical triggers that they have to avoid as they work on strategies to deal with them.

Ciara didn't hold back when it came to her thoughts on "triggering" and "communication" between besties, but it didn't quite come off the way she intended.

Now the tweet has made major waves on Twitter, which isn't surprising due to the controversial statement.

She posted:

"One of my friends told me she can't talk to me right now, because my success is triggering her insecurities and jealousy."
"I respect the hell out of her for being open and vulnerable."
"Communication is key, which is why we must all come from a place of non-judgement."

Talking about a friend's insecurity and jealousy seems like something that should not be blatantly exposed for the world to see. It seems a little insensitive to broadcast this to begin with, but doing so in a humblebrag has brought criticism from the rest of the internet.

Ciara followed it up with a bit of self help guru inspiration.

"We are all capable of success. If I can do it, so can you."
"It's a matter of believing in yourself. All it takes is dedication and action."

Thanks, Ciara.

The tweets have truly divided Twitter, with some not reacting so kindly.








Others commended her for how she and her friend handled the situation.







Whether or not you believe Ciara and her friend did the right thing—or if you believe this friend being traumatized by Ciara's overwhelming success even exists, one thing's for sure.

Social media posts about your amazing level of success "triggering" your friend isn't a good look.

Kylee Alons/Unsplash

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