Having any number of children is stressful. But which number is the most stressful? If scientists are to be believed, the number is three. That's right, according to a 2013 survey of 7,164 mothers, Today came to the conclusion that having three children is more stressful than having one, two, four, five, or even ten.


Dr. Janet Taylor, a psychiatrist, seemed to counter-intuitively grow more relaxed after having their fourth child:

There's just not enough space in your head for perfectionism when you get to four or more kids.



Put simply, after having four kids, mothers begin to go a little easier on themselves and no longer expect to constantly do a perfect job. Taylor continued:

The more children you have, the more confident you become in your parenting abilities. You have to let go … and then you're just thankful when they all get to school on time.



Going from two children to three was a different story, according to Jill Smokler, founder of Scary Mommy:

Going from one to two was an easy, breezy transition. Two to three, everything was turned upside down...I did not feel like I had it together … just crossing the street and not being able to physically hold all their hands I found tremendously stressful.



In general, however, Mom's were a pretty stressed bunch. On a scale from 1-10, the average stress-level for mothers everywhere was sitting around an 8.5. To be fair to the children, however, 46% of mothers also reported that their romantic partners were the main cause of their stress.




60% of mothers reportedly worried more about their daughters than sons, while another 60% were simply worried there wasn't enough time in the day to get everything they needed to finish completed. Twitter certainly understood the feeling:









There are many difficult jobs in the world, but few more difficult than being a mother...especially a mother of three!

H/T - People, Today

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As if being a mom isn't hard enough, why does society want to heap on more stress. Women who can breastfeed need to be able to breastfeed. They need to do it whenever and wherever.

This has been a contentious, dramatic issue for generations. Some people just can't handle a boob out in public. A boob that is nourishing a child, I might add. When you're hungry, you don't want to wait, so why should a mom, make her baby wait until a more "appropriate" time?

God grow up.

Redditor u/Brace4Landing wanted to chat about what women have to do what they do, by asking:

What are your thoughts about women breastfeeding openly in restaurants?
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Our society has a lot of strange ideas about masculinity. In fact, we have such a string of contradicting and misleading pieces of information on how a man "should" act that it has created a very emotionally stunted pool of men in the United States.

And it's usually traits that differ from this path of "most masculine" that, ironically, make us appealing to potential mates. When people look for a partner, they usually look for some preliminary signs of who that person is, and these are some of the traits that most stuck out upon first impression.

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Have you ever found yourself handing over some hard-earned money while wondering "why am I even paying for this?"

There are some things that absolutely should be "free" - or at least not an extra fee on top of some already-paid money. So let's talk about them.

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Generations are sometimes a little confusing. What makes up a generation? Is it their ages or year they were born? Is it what was happening politically during the formative years? Is it the economic landscape that either afforded or denied certain life expectations? Maybe it's the technology that they had access to.

According to the Pew Research Center, it's all of these things and more. All of these factors can influence a generations understanding of the world and ultimately their thoughts as the move through it.

Depending on what generation you're from, you might have seen the drastic shift from records to CDs to Spotify, from payphones and landlines to cellphones.

Marked by technology and pop culture references, the older generations might actually look to Gen Z, the iGen, with pitty for never truly understanding the struggle of walking to school up hill both ways.

What are the struggles of the past that young people today really won't understand unless they were there to experience it? We went to Ask Reddit to find out.

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