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The show Teletubbies first aired in 1997.

It followed the adventures of Tinky-Winky, Dipsy, Laa Laa and Po—four creatures with televisions in their stomachs.

They used those televisions to watch human children from their brightly-colored utopia ... which human children then watched on TV.


If you didn't watch it, or didn't have a sibling/child that watched it, we probably just made it sound like a horrific Inception sort of deal.

Not our fault. The plot is what it is.

Other characters regularly appeared on the show, but none as frequently as the Sun Baby.

Sun Baby showed up every episode to giggle and coo her way through the day as she watched over the Teletubbies.

Giphy

The show initially went off the air in 2001, but new episodes started happening earlier this year. With those new episodes came renewed interest in what the original cast was up to.

The only real face that people got to know was Sun Baby. So she's the one people checked in on, of course.

That curiosity lead to this tweet and image going viral.

Sun Baby grew up!


It's been twenty-two years since we first saw her face, but still the image of her as an adult had quite a few people feeling their age.

And not exactly loving it.







The idea of Sun Baby making a Sun Baby had a lot of people facing some serious quarter-life crisis issues, but there was a problem.

While original Sun Baby, Jess Smith, was now an adult woman and more than capable of having a baby, the child in the image is not hers.

Teletubbies stepped in to clear things up.

As we mentioned before, new episodes came back this year. OG Sun Baby can't rule forever—particularly since she hasn't been a baby in a long, long time.

A new celestial ruler had to be crowned and now we have Sun Baby Berry.

But people aren't sure if that's better or worse...







So does knowing there is a new Sun Baby make you feel old? Would it make you feel worse to know there are new Teletubbies also?

Yup, the 2019 version of the show features toddler Teletubbies called "tiddlytubbies."

Enjoy that quarter-life crisis!

If you have someone in your life at just the right age for the Teletubbies, you can help them learn to love books with this Teletubbies board book set available here.

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