Twitter Tucker Shaw

Writer and food editor Tucker Shaw was inspired by a conversation he overheard on the train to share his experience losing loved ones to AIDs and HIV.


The series of tweets is heartbreaking, moving, and inspiring.

In a gorgeous piece of writing, Shaw posted nearly two dozen tweets describing losing friends and lovers to HIV. The thread was triggered by the conversation Shaw overheard on a train. Two young men were discussing HIV, with one saying it "galvanized the gay community" and "paved the way to make things better, in the long run."

Too many remember that the "long run" wasn't that long ago.

In its entirety the thread reads:

I overheard a young man on the train on the way home today, talking to another young man. Holding hands.

In college, I guessed. About that age anyway. Much younger than I am.He was talking about AIDS, in a scholarly way. About how it had galvanized the gay community. How it had spurred change. Paved the way to make things better, in the long run.

The long run.

Maybe he's right. I don't know. It's not the first time I've heard the theory. He spoke with clarity and with confidence. Youthful, full of conviction. But.Remember how terrible it was, not that long ago, during the worst times. How many beautiful friends died. One after the other. Brutally. Restlessly. Brittle and damp. In cold rooms with hot lights. Remember?

Some nights, you'd sneak in to that hospital downtown after visiting hours, just to see who was around. It wasn't hard.You'd bring a boom box. Fresh gossip. Trashy magazines and cheap paperbacks. Hash brownies. Anything. Nothing.You'd get kicked out, but you'd sneak back in. Kicked out again. Back in again. Sometimes you'd recognize a friend. Sometimes you wouldn't.

Other nights, you'd go out to dance and drink. A different distraction. You'd see a face in the dark, in the back of the bar. Is it you? Old friend! No. Not him. Just a ghost.At work, you'd find an umbrella, one you'd borrowed a few rainstorms ago from a coworker. I should return it, you'd think. No. No need. He's gone. It's yours now.Season after season. Year after year.

One day you'd get lucky and meet someone lovely. You'd feel happy, optimistic. You'd make plans.Together, you'd keep a list of names in a notebook you bought for thirty cents in Chinatown so you could remember who was still here and who wasn't, because it was so easy to forget. But there were so many names to write down. Too many names. Names you didn't want to write down. When he finally had to go too, you got rid of the notebook. No more names.

Your friends would come over with takeout and wine and you'd see how hard they tried not to ask when he was coming home because they knew he wasn't coming home. No one came home. You'd turn 24. When he'd been gone long enough and it was time to get rid of his stuff, they'd say so. It's time. And you'd do it, you'd give away the shirts, sweaters, jackets. Everything. Except those shoes. You remember the ones. He loved those shoes, you'd say. We loved those shoes. I'll keep those shoes under the bed.

You'd move to a new neighborhood. You'd unpack the first night, take a shower, make the bed because it'd be bedtime. You'd think of the shoes. For the first time, you'd put them on. Look at those shoes. What great shoes.

Air. You'd need air. You'd walk outside in the shoes, just to the stoop. You'd sit. A breeze. A neighbor steps past. "Great shoes," she'd say. But the shoes are too big for you.You'd sit for a while, maybe an hour, maybe more. Then you'd unlace the shoes, set them by the trash on the curb. You'd go back upstairs in your socks. The phone is ringing. More news.

The long run. Wasn't that long ago.

Tucker Shaw


Tucker Shaw


Tucker Shaw


His words hit readers like a punch to the gut.






Everyone pretty much agreed with this.

And the names kept coming.







And some saw hope for the future.


We will never forget.

H/T: The Advocate, Thread Reader

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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