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Family is everything. But... family is also crazy and burdened with deep secrets. When we start to excavate some of those secrets we learn why some much makes sense and we learn things we can NEVER unlearn!

Redditor u/starman123 wanted to hear about everyone else's family dramas by asking..... Reddit, what parts of your family history is interesting?


You're Banished!

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My great uncle traced our family back 14 generations. We tried to take over in Wales, failed and were then banished. dansden

The Community Stain. 

Interesting, if not incredibly sad. I had a great great grandma (or aunt, can't remember) who had 13 children out of wedlock, all by different men. She was nicknamed notoriously loose Julie by her town. The doctor told her not to have anymore children after the 12th, but she did so, and both her and that baby died.

The community felt she was such a stain on the town's reputation they refused to bury her in the town cemetery (back in the old days, small town). PeppermintCarnations

The Affair. 

Grandfather had an affair with my grandmother's sister. He got her pregnant and when the little boy turned 7, he went to live with my grandparents... and they raised him as their own. The pain my grandmother must have felt is insane. I didn't learn this until this year at 36. London82

To Australia! 

My Swedish ancestors arrived to Australia by boat. When they arrived one of them got crushed by a crate that fell off a crane on the docks. He made it all the way and didn't even get to set foot in Australia. nimernith

The Loop.

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My family tree has this one branch that loops back to itself... The_Blatalian

Oh yeah? My family tree is essentially a family diamond.

My dad is my cousin and my grandpa is my uncle.

No, I'm not kidding. lukan2

Just the 2 of Us. 

My grandfather is an identical twin. During WW2 he joined the military and his twin took his place at his job. Grandfather got out of the army made up a new name he's been going by since. handsthefram

Generations. 

Women in my family have been going to college for seven generations (since the 1840s). Most of them have Master's degrees

Also one of these women (either my g-grandma or my g-g-grandma) was involved in the first car wreck in her city as a teenager when she stole her parent's car and drove it into a horse-drawn buggy. A legend. beesareoutthere

The Tilleys....

There were two Tilley's on the Mayflower that I could potentially be very distant relatives to. Apparently a prostitute and a horse thief. cockapooch

Elizabeth Tilley is my 14th great grandmother. No word on her profession or penchant for equine thievery. hedpe70

Wife 2.0

My great grandfather came over from Germany with his wife. They had one child, but her second was an ectopic pregnancy, which killed her. So he brought her older sister over from Germany and made her wife 2.0. littlest_ginger

Shatner/Eastwood.

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I have pictures of my great great grandpa, great grandpa, regular old grandpa and dad. They look exactly alike. You couldn't tell them apart.

My dad just had girls, but my sister has a son and he looks exactly like my dad. They all look like a William Shatner and Clint Eastwood combo. The male genes are strong in our family.

ETA - all the girls in our family look like their mothers. My sister and I are a carbon copy of our mom, my aunts look nothing like my grandpa. If I was standing next to my dad you'd never know we were related. It's like the DNA said 'I have one job and one job only.'

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Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


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