Normally, your only chance to nab an Oscar is by becoming one of the most talented filmmakers or actors of your generation, make or star in an incredible movie, and securing a majority of votes from the Academy. For those of us who don't have that kind of time or talent, however, a rare opportunity to buy an Oscar statuette has just appeared in Los Angeles: Auction house Profiles in History has announced many Oscars from Hollywood's golden age will be up for bid starting on December 11.


The first Oscar is a best-picture statuette originally awarded to Mutiny on the Bounty way back in 1936. The Academy Awards had been running for under a decade at that point, and the award was given by Frank Capra to winner Irving Thalberg at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. It's expected to sell for somewhere between $200,000 and $300,000. The award is being sold by the Thalberg family.



The other statuette is also a Best Ppicture Oscar, this one for 1947's Gentleman's Agreement starring Gregory Peck. The seller wishes to remain anonymous but expects the award to make between $150,000 to $200,000.




Other awards up for auction include Hans Dreier's art-direction Oscar for Sunset Boulevard (1950) as well as Gloria Swanson's Golden Globe for best actress in a drama.


The Academy firmly believes that "Oscars should be won, not sold." To enforce this belief, beginning in 1951, Oscar winners signed contracts stipulating that before they could sell an Oscar statuette, they must offer it back to the Academy for $1. Occasionally, however, Oscars awarded prior to this rule will sell for huge amounts of money. Pop superstar Michael Jackson acquired David O. Selznick's Gone With the Wind Oscar "for a record $1.5 million."


Similarly, in 2011, the Citizen Kane statuette awarded to Orson Welles was later sold for $861,542.

Twitter isn't so sure the high price tag would be worth it:





Most of us will never win an Oscar, but if you've made enough money, you may still be able to display one on your mantle. Don't miss out on this exciting opportunity!



H/T - NBC, The Hollywood Reporter

Dating and the search for love and companionship... What a nightmare.

This journey plays out nothing like in the movies.

Every Prince or Princess (or everything in BTW) seems to have a touch of the psycho.

The things people say during what should be simple dinner conversation can leave a dining partner aghast.

Like... do you hear you?

Redditor detroit_michigldan wanted to discuss all the best ways to crash and burn when trying to make a romantic connection. They asked:

"You're on a date and it's going really great. What can another person say to ruin it completely?"
Keep reading... Show less
People Explain What Instantly Makes Them Dislike Someone
gabrielle_cc from Pixabay

When we first meet someone–whether through mutual friends, at school, or in a new work setting–we generally feel people out to determine if they're worth getting to know.

Keep reading... Show less
People Break Down The Dumbest Thing They Believed As A Child
Photo by Caleb Woods on Unsplash

Children tend to believe just about anything they hear.

That there are monsters under your bed, watching too much TV will make your head explode, and silly faces will be permanent if you make them too often.

The sky is truly the limit when it comes to silly things that children will believe.

Some call it naivitée, other's youthful innocence.

But it's hard not to look back with embarrassment on certain things we believed as a child, that today might simply seem dumb.

Redditor Disastrous_Toe_6548 was curious to learn the multitude of silly things people believed when they were children, leading them to ask:

"What's the dumbest thing you believed as a kid?"


Keep reading... Show less