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Recent research by Pew Research Center and Trinity College shows that there has been a rise in practicing witches, or Wiccans, over the past few decades.


The rise in the spiritual practice could be a result of the growing interest in astrology, tarot cards and crystals amongst millennials.

Quartzy reported that witchcraft is so popular, in fact, that Sephora recently caught flack for a "Starter Witch Kit," aimed at the mysticism dabbling crowd. However, with the growing number of practicing witches, the product was considered offensive and taken off shelves.

There is also data that shows the increase of pagan practices.

From 1998 to 2008, Trinity College in Connecticut performed three detailed religion-based surveys.

"From an estimated 8,000 Wiccans in 1990, they found there were about 340,000 practitioners in 2008."

The Pew Research Center also performed a survey in 2014.

"It found that 0.4% of Americans, or around 1 to 1.5 million people, identify as Wicca or Pagan—which suggests continued robust growth for the communities."

Christian author Julie Roys feels as though the rise in paganism is understandable.

"It makes sense that witchcraft and the occult would rise as society becomes increasingly postmodern. The rejection of Christianity has left a void that people, as inherently spiritual beings, will seek to fill."
She continued saying,
"Plus, Wicca has effectively repackaged witchcraft for millennial consumption. No longer is witchcraft and paganism satanic and demonic, it's a 'pre-Christian tradition' that promotes 'free thought' and 'understanding of earth and nature."

Many people are not surprised by the news, as Wiccans tend to live relatively conventional lives (contrary to some beliefs).





Others are glad that religion in America might be getting shaken up a bit.




If the Pew Research Center's number of 1.5 million Wiccans is correct, then there are more witches in America than the 1.4 million Presbyterians.

H/T: Newsweek, Quartzy

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