JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

Koebere Bull of New Jersey averted what could have been an unfathomable tragedy by following her gut and reporting a racist she encountered on Facebook.


On the morning of Wednesday, October 17, Bull received a message from 20-year-old Dylan Jarrell, who used hateful language and claimed he wanted her children dead because they were black. Obviously, the situation was a trying one for Bull:

(He was) basically repeating himself about hoping my children would die and be hung because they're black. It was definitely racially motivated, 'you and your monkey children' and using the 'n' word a lot.



But something about the message stuck with her past the initial revulsion. She told WKYT:

Something in the back of my head was like this isn't right, like something's not sitting well.

Recognizing the prominent connection between people who threaten violence against people of color and those who commit it, Bull decided she should contact the authorities. Her friends were able to determine where Jarrell lived using his social media and they passed the information on to local authorities.



The case was investigated by State Trooper Josh Satterly. On Thursday morning, Jarrell "was caught backing out of his driveway with the tools he needed to commit this heinous act." Police Commissioner Richard Sanders told WKYT:

That call put police on his street just in the nick of time. Kentucky State Police, not using his name, told reporters the 20 year old was pulling out of his driveway with hundreds of rounds of ammunition and a detailed plan of attack on two school districts - Anderson County Schools and Shelby County Public Schools.





The internet was relieved that Bull's quick thinking averted what could have been a major shooting:






Anderson County Schools cancelled its Friday classes due to threats of violence. Bull is just glad she took Jarrell's threats seriously enough to take action:

I would hope that someone would, in the same situation, just do the same thing. Because, obviously, you never know. It could be an idle threat or it could be the next mass shooter. It's our future. These kids are our future, my kids, the kids of Lawrenceburg and Anderson County, and we have to give them a fighting shot.

H/T - Jezebel, WKYT

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


Keep reading... Show less
Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


Keep reading... Show less