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Master of organization Marie Kondo can now show you how to meet that New Year's resolution to tidy up your home. Her new Netflix reality show, aptly named Tidying Up With Marie Kondo, dropped on January 1, bringing fans eight episodes to see how this professional de-clutters people's homes.


You may not get through them all before looking around your own space and realizing a few things could go.




Kondo is famous for her book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. In it, she advocates some very specific rules about how to organize your space called the KonMari Method. The basis of her approach is to only keep items that "spark joy."

This mentality is a reversal of how most people get rid of things. In our culture, a status quo bias makes us keep things until we have a reason to get rid of them. By specifically focusing on items that we use or to which have a deep attachment, Kondo is able to convince her clients to get rid of the rest, cutting down on a lot of unneeded things.

It's a lot more to take in than you'd think.




The new Netflix show takes her philosophy and combines it with the house makeover format. It splits between segments showing the family and their issues with clutter, and segments where Kondo addresses the audience directly for instructional interludes.

As part of the process, we see families go through the order the KonMari dictates. Starting with clothes, they take every item they own and throw it on their bed. After going through and removing things that don't spark joy, they fold what remains into small rectangles that have become something of a calling card.

After clothes, Kondo suggests going through books, papers, "komono" or miscellaneous, and finally sentimental items. This order is hammered home in the book, and the TV show displays its effectiveness.

Of course, you have to wonder how this method would fit some situations.





The show is available for streaming on Netflix. In the eight episodes, we follow Marie Kondo as she helps de-clutter homes for a family with toddlers, empty nesters, and a family of dogs.

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