JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Space X/Youtube

Scientists and citizens are rejoicing after the successful launch of NASA's carbon detecting observatory the OCO-3 by Space X this Saturday.


At 2:48 a.m. ET Saturday morning, Space X successfully launched NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3, sending OCO-3 to the International Space Station (ISS) where it will begin its carbon detecting mission.

Once attached to the ISS the "refrigerator-sized space machine" will monitor carbon dioxide levels across the globe.

The Saturday launched represented the end of a long journey for the OCO-3, which spent the last two years fighting technical issues and political headwinds on its way to space.


Before OCO-3 even hit the launch pad though the scientific observatory faced considerable resistance getting off the ground. The Trump administration which has dismantled much of NASA's previous climate science research threw up roadblocks for Earth-monitoring devices in 2017 and 2018.

After the political hurdles were cleared though the launched faced further technical delays.

The launch was originally scheduled for late April but NASA asked Space X to reschedule until astronauts aboard the ISS could address a power distribution issue.

Then on Friday Space X decided to delay the launch another 24-hours while engineers fixed a power issue on the drone barge where the rocket lands upon reentry.

On Saturday though Space X's Falcon 9 rocket finally took off launching the OCO-3 towards its mission on the ISS.

You can view the full CRS-17 mission launch below.


CRS-17 Mission www.youtube.com

It was an important moment for Space X, NASA and climate research and many applauded the successful launch.











From its perch far above Earth the OCO-3 can detect carbon dioxide concentrations as low as 1 part per million. During its mission OCO-3 will not only monitor carbon emitting areas like cities and countries but also carbon reducing regions of the world like oceans and forests.

"Carbon dioxide is the most important gas humans are emitting into the atmosphere," said Annmarie Eldering, project scientist for the OCO-3 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in a February interview with Mashable. "Understanding how it will play out in the future is critical."

But according to researchers the most critical element will be time. The OCO-3 is picking up its mission where OCO-2 left off and for researchers long-term data is a crucial component of climate science that allows that allows them to follow environmental trends.

"The longer the records grow, the more important they become," Pontus Olofsson, an associate research professor at Boston University told Mashable. "It's like an exponential increase in importance."

Researchers hope such data will help us in further understanding the effects of high carbon levels in our atmosphere which are currently the highest concentrations have been in the last 15 million years.

Kylee Alons/Unsplash

We all need a little wholesome content every now and then. Much of the world, especially right now, can seem very dark and depressing.

It's important to recognize that not all of the world is as scary as it may seem. So we wanted to see what wholesome facts people had to share with us.

In fact, the world "wholesome" literally means "promoting health or well-being of mind or spirit."

Take a minute to enjoy this list of wholesome facts that will just make your heart melt.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Shaking hands... what's up with that?

Could this social custom be going out of style given that we're all in the middle of a global pandemic and have become hyperaware of all the germs around us?

And not just that, but just how nasty people are? Why would you want to shake hands with them?

People shared their opinions after Redditor alebenchhe asked the online community,

"What social customs do we need to retire?"
Keep reading... Show less
Image by doodlartdotcom from Pixabay

I have a paralyzing fear of death. If I could I would live forever. Have you ever seen the movie "Death Becomes Her?" I would give every penny for that potion. And I wouldn't be all crazy like them.

Live well forever and be happy? It's possible. Even though life is nuts and scary, you're still here. What if there is nothing after the final breath? I don't want to just not exist, while everybody else just gets to keep on dancing.

In my hopes I see a Heaven with ice cream and vodka. So I'm going to hold onto that until eternal life is an option. Let's hear from the gallery...

Redditor u/St3fan34 wanted to discuss life after life, by asking:

What do you think really happens after death?
Keep reading... Show less