SpaceX Just Launched A NASA Instrument Into Space That Will Be Critical To Our Survival
Space X/Youtube

Scientists and citizens are rejoicing after the successful launch of NASA's carbon detecting observatory the OCO-3 by Space X this Saturday.


At 2:48 a.m. ET Saturday morning, Space X successfully launched NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3, sending OCO-3 to the International Space Station (ISS) where it will begin its carbon detecting mission.

Once attached to the ISS the "refrigerator-sized space machine" will monitor carbon dioxide levels across the globe.

The Saturday launched represented the end of a long journey for the OCO-3, which spent the last two years fighting technical issues and political headwinds on its way to space.


Before OCO-3 even hit the launch pad though the scientific observatory faced considerable resistance getting off the ground. The Trump administration which has dismantled much of NASA's previous climate science research threw up roadblocks for Earth-monitoring devices in 2017 and 2018.

After the political hurdles were cleared though the launched faced further technical delays.

The launch was originally scheduled for late April but NASA asked Space X to reschedule until astronauts aboard the ISS could address a power distribution issue.

Then on Friday Space X decided to delay the launch another 24-hours while engineers fixed a power issue on the drone barge where the rocket lands upon reentry.

On Saturday though Space X's Falcon 9 rocket finally took off launching the OCO-3 towards its mission on the ISS.

You can view the full CRS-17 mission launch below.


CRS-17 Mission www.youtube.com

It was an important moment for Space X, NASA and climate research and many applauded the successful launch.











From its perch far above Earth the OCO-3 can detect carbon dioxide concentrations as low as 1 part per million. During its mission OCO-3 will not only monitor carbon emitting areas like cities and countries but also carbon reducing regions of the world like oceans and forests.

"Carbon dioxide is the most important gas humans are emitting into the atmosphere," said Annmarie Eldering, project scientist for the OCO-3 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in a February interview with Mashable. "Understanding how it will play out in the future is critical."

But according to researchers the most critical element will be time. The OCO-3 is picking up its mission where OCO-2 left off and for researchers long-term data is a crucial component of climate science that allows that allows them to follow environmental trends.

"The longer the records grow, the more important they become," Pontus Olofsson, an associate research professor at Boston University told Mashable. "It's like an exponential increase in importance."

Researchers hope such data will help us in further understanding the effects of high carbon levels in our atmosphere which are currently the highest concentrations have been in the last 15 million years.

People Explain Which Lessons Aren't Taught In History Class But Should Be
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It's highly believed that it is important to learn history as a means to improve our future.

What is often overlooked is that what is taught in history class is going to be very different depending on where you went to school.

And this isn't just internationally, even different regions of the United states will likely have very different lessons on American history.

This frequently results in our learning fascinating, heartbreaking and horrifying historical facts which our middle or high school history teachers neglected to teach us.

Redditor Acherontia_atropos91 was curious to learn things people either wished they had learned, or believe they should have learned, in their school history class, leading them to ask:

What isn’t taught in history class but should be?
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People Share The Most Random Things They Miss About Life Before The Pandemic
Photo by Noah on Unsplash

So apparently we are in the endemic phase of this nonsense.

We have light at the end of the tunnel.

So what now?

Where do we go from here?

Normal seems like an outdated word.

How do we get back to normal though?

Is it even possible?

What are reaching back to?

Life pre-Covid.

Those were the days.

If only we could bring them back.

Redditor hetravelingsong wanted to discuss our new normal in this hopeful "endemic" phase. So they asked:

"What’s something random you miss about pre-COVID times?"
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Atheists Break Down What They Actually Do Believe In
Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

What do you believe?

Is there a GOD in the sky?

Is he guiding us and helping us?

Life is really hard. Why is that is a big entity is up there loving us?

Atheists have taken a lot of heat for what feels like shunning GOD.

What if they've been right all along?

Maybe let's take a listen and see what they really think.

Redditor __Jacob______ wanted to hear from the people who don't really believe all that "God" stuff. They asked:

"Atheists, what do you believe in?"
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The list of what irritates me is endless.

I mean... breathing too loud or dust can set me off.

I'm a bit unstable, yes.

But I'm not alone.

So let's discuss.

Redditor Aburntbagel6 wanted to hear about all the times many of us just couldn't control our disdain. They asked:

"What never fails to piss you off?"
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