JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

On Saturday, October 20, a man walked into Sup Dogs, a popular eatery in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and ordered two waters. The waitress, Alaina Custer, brought him his drinks, completely unaware that the man was actually famous YouTuber Mr. Beast. After drinking his water, Mr. Beast left the restaurant, but not before laying down a $10,000 tip, along with a note that read:

"Thanks for the delicious water."

Brett Oliverio, the owner of the store, told The News & Observer his waitress' reaction was being secretly filmed for an upcoming video:

"Ended up being a YouTube star, Mr. Beast. They filmed the server's reaction as she picked up the money. Crazy."

Sup Dogs is a well-known restaurant among students of nearby East Carolina University, and waiters often receive generous tips, but Oliverio is certain this is the largest one in his business' history:

"That's the biggest ever. Second closest was $500."

When Custer picked up the tip, she didn't think it was real:

"I literally didn't think it was real. I picked it up and it was a giant stack of hundreds,. I was shaking and just kept asking Brett, 'What is this?' I thought someone was playing a joke on me."

Perhaps inspired by Mr. Beast's random act of kindness, Custer decided to split her tip with the entire waitstaff.

Keeping it all would seem especially silly considering all she did was serve two waters.

After finding the tip, Custer moved on to the table with two men who were filming her. She asked them if they knew what was going on:

"They just told me about their YouTube channel and how they were going around blessing servers' days."

Mr. Beast then returned to the restaurant to meet with the rest of his crew, and was greeted with a big hug from Custer.

That much money can make a significant difference in a college student's life:

"I was so blessed to have that money. I mean, most of us that work at Sup Dogs are broke college kids and that's going to help me out so much. We got to all split it up, which will help a lot of people."

Twitter loved Mr. Beast's focus on human kindness:



Mr. Beast's real name is Jimmy, and he's well known among his 8.8 million subscribers for his incredibly generous random acts of kindness.



According to Oliverio, Mr. Beast gave him a message before he left:

"Good people are still doing good things these days."

H/T - The News & Observer, HuffPost

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


Keep reading... Show less
Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


Keep reading... Show less