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Gerardo Barreto / EyeEm vias Getty Images; Twitter: @btsoeuvre

An oppressed group having to endure the slings and arrows of a bigoted society is nothing new.

They fight against it, but at least most people acknowledge the struggle.


Which may be why it's so frustrating when someone reduces it to being "too sensitive."

Such was the case with Twitter user V or @TheJustinAllenn who posted:

"the lgbt community is entirely way too sensitive"

It's no secret that members of the LGBTQ+ community have to fight daily for their right just to exist.

The number of reported hate crimes are on the rise and one in five LGBTQ people say they experienced a hate crime. While we like to think we're past it, this country still sees gay and trans people murdered for just existing.

It was time to let this Twitter user know the facts.






LGBTQ youth are at a significantly higher risk of suicide attempts. In general, they are more than three times as likely as non-LGBTQ kids to try, while transgender youth attempt it at six times the rate of their cisgender, heterosexual peers.

Meanwhile politicians keep trying to legislate their very existence away.

Just two days ago, President Trump's transgender ban in the military was allowed to go through while the order is argued in courts. Meanwhile, Utah is trying to prevent transgender people from changing their gender on official forms, such as their birth certificate, which would make things a lot harder for them to get the help and support they need.

Dealing with all these attacks in the real world, people weren't about to let this guy continue online.







The negative effects of the society we live in don't just affect LGBTQ+ people. Rigid gender identities result in a narrow and harmful definition of masculinity that harms a man's ability to be open and honest, leading to self-destructive coping mechanisms.

This is what people are referring to when they say "toxic masculinity."






As the internet let this user know, LGBTQ people have to deal with a lot of oppression and his own toxic masculinity blinds him to the privilege he experiences. There's a lot that can be said, but in the end, only one user had the perfect succinct comment.


Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


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