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We've all experienced stage fright at some point in our lives.

Remember your first school play or talent show and feeling that paralysis after staring out into a sea of people with all eyes focused on you?

As kids, we demanded attention. But when we got it without asking — it was awkward, maybe even terrifying.

For one young boy who was performing "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" with his two cousins, the force was with him. In this case, however, he channeled his dark side.


During a family reunion talent show in Buffalo, Wyoming, the boy went rogue and sang "The Imperial March" from the Star Wars movies. The iconic earworm was the sinister theme composed by the great John Williams and is associated with the arrival of Darth Vader.

And while the kid remained true to the song's theme, the Death Star was not the kind of star his singing companions were thinking of.

Family member Erin Gibson posted the hilarious moment that took place a year ago.

"Sometimes when I need to laugh, I think about the time my cousin's son took over a group rendition of 'Twinkle Twinkle Little Star' to sing the 'Imperial March.'"

The tweet went viral and received over 600k likes and was eventually noticed by one famous Jedi.

It was none other than Luke Skywalker, himself, Mark Hamill, who playfully warned his followers about this disturbance in the force.






Members of the Resistance let their guard down and praised the youngling.




People could hardly contain themselves over his endearing dark innocence.





Gibson regretted not having shared the clip sooner.

"I've been sitting on this gem for almost a year," she wrote.

"I really should've put it out there with more gusto much sooner!"


Better late than never!

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