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LEGO is making strides towards educational and not just imagination-driven toys.


LEGO started in August of 1932 in Billund, Denmark. The original name was "leg godt" which translates to "play well."

According to their website, it is what LEGO strives for in name and mission.

Once again LEGO is working toward making toys for everyone. Recently they released a video of their newest product: LEGOs that help teach braille.

The video, found below, shows students playing with the blocks. This is a perfect demonstration of how LEGO strives to include everyone in their play sets.

The Danish Association of the Blind suggested this to LEGO back in 2011. Brazil-based Dorina Nowill Foundation for the Blind suggested them again in 2017.

LEGO worked on sets with both foundations as well as two British charities and a Norweigan one.

The set will be made up of 250 bricks covering the complete Braille alphabet, numbers from zero to nine, and math symbols.

It will also include:

"inspiration for teaching and interactive games."

The Braille Bricks are currently undergoing testing in Portuguese, Danish, English and Norwegian schools with plans for testing of French, Spanish and German versions later in the year.

Treasurer of the European Blind Union, Philippe Chazal, said:

"With thousands of audiobooks and computer programs now available, fewer kids are learning to read Braille. This is particularly critical when we know that Braille users often are more independent, have a higher level of education and better employment opportunities."
"We strongly believe Lego Braille Bricks can help boost the level of interest in learning Braille, so we're thrilled that the Lego Foundation is making it possible to further this concept and bring it to children around the world."

The feedback on the video has been largely positive.






One teacher even shared photos of students learning braille.

This combination seems perfect for all LEGO fans.


Morten Bond is the senior art director for the Lego Group. Bond is losing his eyesight due to a genetic eye disorder.

He said:

"Experiencing reactions from both students and teachers to Lego Braille Bricks has been hugely inspirational and reminded me that the only limitations I will meet in life are those I create in my mind."

He continued, adding:

"I am moved to see the impact this product has on developing blind and visually impaired children's academic confidence and curiosity already in its infant days."

This is an amazing idea that will allow blind and visually impaired students a more interactive way to learn and give them the independence that they may have missed out on otherwise.

Disney/YouTube

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