JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

Joey King, the actress famous for The Conjuring, Ramona & Beezus, and The Kissing Booth (among others), just shaved her head for an upcoming role. While many actresses may see losing their locks as a necessary evil of the business, King says she loved doing it, and thinks more women should give the hairless lifestyle a try.


Here's what Joey looked like while she still had hair:





King will soon be starring in The Act, a new seasonal anthology series from Hulu which follows incredible true-crime stories. The first season will tell the story of Gypsy Rose Blancharde's murder of her mother, and required King to shave her head:




King thinks shaving her head is "empowering" and recommends women everywhere give it a try:

I've never really had an attachment to my hair. I couldn't care less what happens to it. No part of me was nervous or was second-guessing it...So many people would ask me, 'Are you really scared?' or 'Are you nervous?' or say, 'You're so brave.' And I'd go, 'I'm not brave, I'm just cutting my hair of.'





To be fair, this is far from King's first time shaving her head. She sported a buzzed scalp "when she was 11 for The Dark Knight Rises and again when she was 14 for Wish I Was Here."






To King, shaving her head feels like setting herself free:

I know this sounds crazy, and not a lot of people will agree with me, but I think every woman should shave her head at least once in her life. It's not like they're going to regret it 10 years down the line when their hair is long again. It's something that's very freeing, really fun, and really empowering.

Some fans were sad to see Joey's hair go...




But others were just as excited for the new look!





When it premieres, be sure to check out Hulu's The Act, based on Michelle Dean's 2016 BuzzFeed article.

H/T - Buzzfeed, ABC News

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

Keep reading... Show less