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When a same-sex penguin couple in a Denmark zoo noticed a baby chick left unattended by its birth parents, they did what they thought was best.

The gay King penguins swooped in and rescued it as if it was their own.



According to Indy100, the Odense Zoo staff referred to the incident as a kidnapping.

Animal handler Sandie Hedegård Munck, explained to Danish broadcaster DR about what she thinks happened.

"I think the female has been out to get her bath, and then it has been the male's turn to care for the chick
He may have left that, and that couple has thought, it's a pity, we'll get it."


Dyan deNapoli gave further insight into the behavioral nature of penguins to Newsweek:

"In the wild, the natural behavior is that up until a certain age, one of the parents will always be with the chick."

The father returned to discover the missing chick but was seen wandering around as if nothing happened.

This sort of abduction isn't unusual in the wild.

deNapoli added:

"It does happen both in the wild and in zoos and aquariums. It's unusual, but it does happen from time to time."


A day later, the chick's biological parents confronted the kidnapping couple who held the little one wedged between their bodies for protection.

The meeting turned into a physical altercation and was recorded and posted on Odense Zoo's Facebook page.

The animal handlers can be seen intervening during the scuffle and returning the chick to its rightful parents.


Twitter weighed in with their observations over the incident.







All was not lost, however. After they gay penguins displayed their devotion to parenthood, the zoo handlers rewarded them with an unwanted egg from a mother unable to take care of her baby.

A same-sex couple wanting a child of their own is not a new development in the animal kingdom. They want someone to love and nurture just like other straight couples.






The New York Times published a story about "Roy" and "Silo," two chinstrap penguins who so desperately wanted a baby, they put a rock in their nest and sat on it.


Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson wrote a book called And Tango Makes Three, chronicling Roy and Silo's story.

Chief keeper Rob Gramzay bestowed an unwanted egg upon the loving couple.

Eventually, baby Tango was born and the couple raised it until she developed far enough along to be on her own.

H/T - Indy100, YouTube, Twitter, Newsweek, People, NYtimes

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