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Flight attendant Patrisha Organo knew her flight on Tuesday, November 6, was an important one: she was finishing her final certifications and tests to become a assistant line administrator. Before the flight was over, however, circumstances would call upon her to step up in a way very few flight attendants ever have, and the story of how she rose to the occasion is inspiring people all over the world.


During her flight, which took place in the early morning, Organo heard the sound of a baby crying and knew immediately it was because the baby was hungry. She told Yahoo! Lifestyle:

"You know the difference between a cry of hunger, a cry of sleepiness, or a cry of something else."

Patrisha Organo/Facebook


A new mother herself, Organo approached the crying baby and its mother, asking if the baby needed to eat. The mother revealed tearfully that she had run out of formula to feed her child. Organo told the story in a Facebook post:

"Passengers started looking and staring at the tiny, fragile crying infant. There's no formula milk onboard. I thought to myself, there's only one thing I could offer and that's my own milk."


After checking with her supervisors, Organo pitched her plan to the mother, who emphatically responded "Yes, yes!" Organo then led the mother and baby to a secluded private area where she could feed the little girl:

"The other passengers had no idea what was going on. The baby was so hungry, the way she latched on."


Patrisha Organo/Facebook

Patrisha Organo/Facebook

The mother was immensely relieved her child was now able to eat, something Organo can empathize with, considering her own early struggles with breastfeeding:

"In my early days of breastfeeding, I would really like to give up, but because I have the strong support of my husband, I kept going. He kept encouraging me. It was a storm of emotion and without my husband's support, I could never do it."


Patrisha Organo/Facebook

Organo posted about the entire encounter on Facebook, hoping to help normalize breastfeeding but having no idea her post would go viral and inspire a deluge of accolades and shock. As of the writing of this article, the post has been shared over 35k times and has garnered around 173k reactions on Facebook.

"When I posted that on Facebook, it was to inspire other people and to normalize breastfeeding...I am so overwhelmed with the positive comments!"







On that day, Organo truly stepped up to help her passengers. Not only did she manage to gain internet virality, she also passed her evaluation as a line administrator! All in all, it was an incredibly successful flight.


Patrisha Organo/Facebook


H/T - Yahoo!, Facebook

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