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Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) has been a force to be reckoned with since she began serving in Congress.

Her inspiring run for office is the inspiration behind Netflix's Knock Down the House, a documentary which follows the journey of four women who ran for the U.S. Congress in 2018.


The freshman Congresswoman took to Twitter to plug the news of the documentary's release.

The film debuts on Netflix and in select theaters on May 1.

If you watch the trailer, you'll see glimpses of the three women who appear alongside Ocasio-Cortez: Amy Vilela, Cori Bush and Paula Jean Swearengin.

Ocasio-Cortez was the only one of the four who won her race for office.

The Knock Down the House social media account is already pushing to get people to see the film in theaters—so ya'll have no excuse.

People are undoubtedly excited for the film.




Amy Vilela was inspired to run for office after her uninsured young daughter died after being denied emergency medical care.

Since then, she's campaigned to consider human lives over profit margins.

Paula Jean Swearengin, a native of West Virginia, has continued to rally against the environmental impacts of the coal mining industry in her home state, a sharp rebuke of President Donald Trump's claims that "good, clean coal" will experience a resurgence.

Cori Bush, an ordained pastor, was inspired to run as she watched the Ferguson protests against police brutality unfold.

It's safe to say we haven't heard the last of these women.

Knock Down the House will only further their names in the public consciousness. As for Ocasio-Cortez... well, you know the story.

Chances are there's a Republican crying about her past as a bartender even before this article goes to print.

Bravo, ladies.

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