JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Noah Wall Model/Facebook

Noah Wall is a boy from England who was diagnosed with a birth defect called spina bifida in which the spinal cord and the brain form without becoming fully enclosed.

He was born with only two percent of his brain, leaving his parents discouraged for any chances of survival from this devastating condition.


On paper, a myriad of other health complications like Edwards Syndrome and Trisomy 13 would indicate he has everything working against him.

But Noah is meant to be here.

He defied expectations after being born and the six-year-old continues growing and his brain shows signs of development.

His survival that could only be described as "extraordinary" according to his parents is confounding medical experts.

In a miraculous turn of events, the six-year-old's parents, Shelly and Rob, told Good Morning Britain that their son has gained function in 80 percent of his brain.

The boy learned how to talk and is hoping to be able to walk, in addition to surfing and skiing with the help of a pioneering clinic in Australia where medics assist him with physiotherapy and cognitive training.


Rob described Noah's prognosis as being grim from the outset.

"It's a very emotive subject," he said.

"Some people say you can't grow a brain."
"Other people say it must have always been there. But if it was and squashed up it would have been so severely damaged he would have been very mentally and physically disabled."

Shelly said:

"Before he was born they gave me the option of a termination five times."
"We got taken into a room and they drew a circle saying 'this brain will only be half a brain."



The devastated parents also signed a "do not resuscitate order" and began making funeral arrangements before their baby was born.


Shelly delivered the baby via C-section on March 6, 2012 because Noah's head had grown so large due to hydrocephalus – a rare brain condition in which excess buildup of cerebrospinal fluid within the ventricles, the empty cavities inside the brain – can permanently damage mental and physical abilities and lead to death.




One parent related to Shelly and Rob's experience and shared his own story about the daughter he almost lost to Non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH), a metabolic disorder.


Noah has become a beacon of hope with his incredible story of survival.

His charming personality and infectious smile are a bonus and are his contributions to a world prone to skepticism.






The parents are helping to raise awareness on their Hugs for Noah website, which chronicles Noah's ailments and his journey of overcoming insurmountable odds.

Shelly is informing women to take plenty of folic acid, a B vitamin, before and during pregnancy to help protect the spine and brain from birth defects.

"Even though I took it I didn't take it early enough," she said.

"No one told me just how important folic acid was."

Noah, who is currently confined to a wheelchair, will continue a lifetime of surgeries but Shelly and Rob are aiming for their son to eventually be able to walk.

With his track record of overcoming obstacles, we're optimistic he will continue to rise above.

Pixabay

As someone who creates online content daily, and has worked in social media for the last decade or so, I've seen a LOT of stock photography.

I work with it every day - and honestly I've wondered more than once how the model would react to knowing how their picture was being used.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Rudy and Peter Skitterians from Pixabay

What is it about creepy kids?

There's just something about those high pitched voices uttering the darkest ideas and unexplained happenings.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by vinayr16 from Pixabay

Sometimes your job can be a point of pride in your life, something you happily discuss with people either because you're proud of what you do or because you want people to know what kind of impact you make in others' lives.

However, there are those who prefer to keep what they do on the down-low.

Speaking about what you do could lead to complications, and who has time for that?

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Everyone has their secrets. Some secrets are so deeply personal, however, that those who harbor them don't tell a soul. Why? Is it out of fear? Judgment? An intense desire for privacy? The need to feel like they're one of those people in the movies who don't communicate even though communication would save us an extra 90 minutes of "plot"? Suffice it to say it's complicated.

After Redditor poutinerie asked the online community, "What's a secret that will probably die with you?" people––thanks to being under the guise of anonymity––decided to share their stories.

Warning: Some sensitive material ahead.

Keep reading... Show less