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President Donald Trump claimed at a special White House dinner for only his Evangelical Christian supporters that if Democrats win in the November midterms, they will become violent.

When asked to clarify two days later, Trump stood by his claim.


During Trump's closed door, invitation only dinner with evangelical Christian leaders, the President stated he nixed the law forbidding churches and charities from officially endorsing political candidates.

In reality, the law still remains, despite efforts made in Congress last year to eradicate it.

The statement was made during an appeal for the religious leaders to place pressure from the pulpit on their parishioners to go vote for Trump endorsed candidates in November. Because nothing was more important to Jesus than Republican Ted Cruz defeating Democrat Beto O'Rourke for a Senate seat in Texas in 2018.

On the topic of the November midterm elections, Trump said if Democrats win:

"...they will overturn everything that we've done and they'll do it quickly and violently, and violently. [sic] There's violence. When you look at Antifa and you look at some of these groups — these are violent people."

So much for Trump's prior claim that White Supremacists and anti-fascist protesters had "good people on both sides."

But Bette Midler is having none of it.

When Broadway, film and recording star Bette Midler got wind of Trump's claim that Democrats are "violent people," she immediately responded on Twitter.


The Divine Miss M just closed her Tony-winning performance as Dolly Levi in Hello, Dolly! on Broadway.

The internet is loving Bette's rebuttal.



Others offered Democrats alternates to their tote bags.











While others just showed their appreciation for Midler's wit.





Bette went on to share a photo of her newly acquired weapons of choice.


You can buy your own PBS tote here.


H/T: Yahoo! Entertainment, CBS News, NBC News

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Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

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The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
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