Robert Alexander/Getty Images, @uhleczis/Twitter

Consumers of Ben & Jerry's ice cream are about to get a taste of politics by embracing 4/20, which is national weed-appreciation day.

As if we need a holiday for toking, rallies across the country in places like California and Denver where marijuana is legal, are celebrating the occasion by lighting up, laughing, and snacking on Doritos as the role of recreational cannabis use slowly becomes legalized at a federal level.

Ben & Jerry's is celebrating 4/20 and the legalization of cannabis in 33 states with free ice cream, but they are also launching a criminal justice reform campaign through a petition asking Congress to expunge prior marijuana convictions.


The campaign is a reaction towards cannabis possession disproportionately penalizing people of color.

Ben & Jerry released a video, stating some woke statistics by asking a question.

"Ever notice how most people who make $$$ off legalized cannabis are white?"

The petition, which received 21,900 signatures since Saturday, read:

"Want to feel really really good this 4/20? Then let's make sure that legalization benefits all of us. That'll turn 4/20 into a day that we all can celebrate."





Ben & Jerry's wrote in their petition:

"And even if you're not in a state that legalized pot, there's a still a pretty good chance that the cops won't hassle you as you spend 4/20 doing your thing."
"If you're a white person."
"Sorry to bring you down, but that's the harsh reality. If you love pot AND you're white, everything is totally awesome these days."

According to data collected from the American Civil Liberties Union between 2001 and 2010, a black person was 3.73 more likely to be arrested for possession of marijuana than a white person.

It's time to stop criminalizing weed.


The ice cream company's petition also asks Congress to give pardons and amnesty only to those who were convicted for marijuana possession.

Ice cream fans still raised an eyebrow over Ben & Jerry's' political involvement.


But that is what the Vermont-based company was founded on.




Their support for the equality of various communities give their brand an added boost of flavor.


Kudos to Ben & Jerry's! However, will the world ever be ready for this flavor in their sundaes?



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