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The 2018 New York Comic Con brought out the city's finest cosplay parade at the Javits Center over the past weekend.

And while there were hundreds of impressive and campy creativity at work among participants, there was one group of women that deserved major props.

These female super heroes incorporated hijabs into their look to represent the Avengers, with characters including Captain America, Thor and Gamora.



One of the cosplayers, Maliha Fairooz, tweeted a couple of group shots and captioned one with "Hello Internet, I give you #HijabHeroes at #nycc2018."



Fairooz helped to identify the members of her crew.


Twitter took notice and responded with much praise for the powerful troop.









They turned heads at the costume contest while representing Marvel.


Fellow fans attending the event were impressed, to say the least. In one word, they were:


People appreciated these women for embracing their culture by proudly donning hijabs. "Congratulations! And thank you for being proud of who you are," wrote one fan.



A couple of Hijabi heroes received honorable mentions.







The movie-poster-ready Twitter photo became the subject of fan art.




So what's in store for the group for NYCC 2019?


Laal Patti media company praised the women for "stealing the show" at the convention and noted that this year was the first time in New York's Comic Con history that Hijabi women participated in cosplay.


"Muslim women draped in Hijab has always been an interest of conflict with the recent Islamophobia," the media company wrote.

"But that does not mean they are banned to attend such diverse events. No Hijab can stop Muslim women to do their thing."

H/T - LaaPatti, TeenVogue, Twitter

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

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