JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
ABC Brisbane

Needle-filled strawberries were shipped out all over Australia and New Zealand, but the crisis was hopefully brought to a close with the arrest of a woman suspected of committing the crime.


While it sounds like a horrifying Halloween prank, the story actually begins in September. Small needles were discovered in the fruit, with a man being sent to the hospital after swallowing "half a sewing needle." Upon inspecting other strawberries, authorities discovered more needles. The needled fruit was discovered in shipments reaching as far out as New Zealand.

The health department for Queensland, Australia, issued a statement advising people to throw out their strawberries, as well as recalling punnets of the fruit.

People have been understandably upset.




While the investigators were sure the needles were placed intentionally and maliciously, they couldn't tell if the needles found their way in at the supplier, the store, or by someone close to the customer.

The 50-year-old woman arrested for the crime had worked for the farm, supervising the fruit pickers. The police tracked her down using DNA evidence recovered from the needles in the fruit.

People just want to know why.



The strawberry industry in Australia is worth nearly $93 million in U.S. dollars. Because of this, the country raised the maximum prison term for fruit tampering to 15 years.

This crime is no joking matter. Unless you're on Twitter.




It is unknown at this time if the woman will be released on bail.

H/T: Australian Broadcasting Company, BBC

Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

Y'all know that one Hannah Montana song? “Everybody makes mistakes! Everybody has those days!" That's the song I sing to myself every time I accidentally burn myself while making ramen. It comforts me to know, however, that there are a lot of worse mistakes out there than some spilled ramen. Who knew?

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Daniel Perrig from Pixabay

When I was younger, it seemed every adult believed that you couldn't swim for several hours after eating. Why did they all believe this? I fought them on this all the time, by the way. I shouldn't have had to, just because I'd eaten some barbecue during a pool party. Guess what, though? That belief is unfounded.

Keep reading... Show less

As much as we're not supposed to feel satisfaction upon observing the struggles of other people, it can be hard to resist a silent, internal fist pump when some blunder occurs immediately after we tried to help the person prevent it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by leo2014 from Pixabay

One of the most upsetting aspects of the Covid-19 pandemic––which is saying a lot, frankly––is the number of people who have been so affected by misinformation and disinformation. You know the ones to which I refer: These are the people who are convinced the virus is a hoax despite the lives it's claimed and the devastation it has wrought on society at large. Disinformation kills––there are stories of people who remained convinced that Covid-19 is a hoax even while intubated in the ICU, even up to their last breath.

After Redditor asked the online community, "Doctors of Reddit, what happened when you diagnosed a Covid-19 denier with Covid-19?" doctors and other medical professionals shared these rather unsettling stories.

Keep reading... Show less