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Emile Ratelband of the Netherlands was born on March 11, 1949, which makes him 69 years old. He's taking legal action to change that, however! Ratelband has filed a lawsuit against the government, asking that they move his date of birth to March 11, 1969, which would make him only 49 years old legally.


Ratelband is a media personality and motivational speaker in the Netherlands. He compares identifying as 49 years old to being transgender:

We live in a time when you can change your name and change your gender. Why can't I decide my own age?

The 69-year-old believes being legally 49 will help him score more dates:

When I'm 69, I am limited. If I'm 49, then I can buy a new house, drive a different car. I can take up more work. When I'm on Tinder and it says I'm 69, I don't get an answer. When I'm 49, with the face I have, I will be in a luxurious position.

One things for sure: no one will accuse Ratelband of low self-esteem.

I feel much younger than my age, I am a young god, I can have all the girls I want but not after I tell them that I am 69. I feel young, I am in great shape and I want this to be legally recognized because I feel abused, aggrieved and discriminated against because of my age.

Twitter users weren't very receptive to Ratelband's arguments.




Some internet users wondered whether the age-changing process could work in the other direction.




If his goal was to convince people he's actually 49, this well-known lawsuit isn't doing Ratelband any favors.


Of course, many Twitter users already believed it was a long-shot.



The judge has acknowledged that it is possible to legally change your gender in the Netherlands, but also that changing someone's age would mean deleting part of their lives in the eyes of the law. The court's final decision is expected within the next four weeks.

H/T - Huffpost, Twitter

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